Verboticism: Pinemyne

'Why are you vacuuming the Christmas tree?'

DEFINITION: n., 1. A pine needle infestation, common during and after the holiday season. 2. Prickly Christmas guests who will not leave and cannot be cleaned up. v., To fall down during a holiday party and hide under a rug.

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Firiends

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: fir - ee - ends

Sentence: It had been a wonderful holiday season. Sidney was thinking back to the parties, gifts and good cheer, as he took down the tree. As usual, there were needles all over the carpet. They had begun to feel like old, familiar firiends, he thought. Many of the needles would remain woven in and under the rug for years, along with the holiday guests who had fallen and disappeared there as well.

Etymology: This word is a combination of several... Fir (Species of evergreen conifer) + Friends (people you know well and regard with affection and trust) + ends (needles are the "ends" of the tree, and the holiday season has ended.

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COMMENTS:

So a thick coat of needles onm the rug would be a fir coat? Great Word...as soon as I saw it I heard the theme from"Friends" in my head...and now I cannot get it to go away! - Nosila, 2008-12-18: 20:43:00

And the furry ends are what remains. - dochanne, 2008-12-18: 22:08:00

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Treeslug

Created by: mezebra

Pronunciation:

Sentence: We hate the morning after, the treeslugs are so prevalent. Bob hasn't been invited to our party in years, he is such a treeslug

Etymology:

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Pinedemic

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: pine/dem/ic

Sentence: The onset of a brutally cold winter sent the thermostats soaring thereby causing extremely dry indoor conditions which ultimately led to a pinedemic of catastrophic proportions.

Etymology: pandemic + pine

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COMMENTS:

Lots of pinedemonium, no doubt. - Mustang, 2008-12-18: 15:28:00

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Needlebain

Created by: roger153

Pronunciation: needle / bain

Sentence: Every year we have to put up with this same needlebain all over the house.

Etymology: pine needle mess

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Scrourge

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: scru/urj

Sentence: Bah humbug! Stepping on pine needles from Christmas past, present and future is the scrourge of Christmas.

Etymology: scrourge + scrooge

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Yulegibbons

Created by: jmotsch

Pronunciation: Yewl gibbins

Sentence: Janice had been fervently combating the yulegibbons since January.

Etymology:

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Holidossus

Created by: Johnhicks

Pronunciation: Hol-y-Dos-sus

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Drunkiferous

Created by: mrowka

Pronunciation: Drunk-If-Erus

Sentence: After guzzling down his holiday spirit, Douglas became drunkiferous. Later on we were able to skyline him into a cab.

Etymology: Drunk (intoxicated)+ Coniferous (type or tree)

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Ofirun

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: oaf fir run

Sentence: Although they love the smell of a real tree and get one every Christmas, by the end of the holidays, George & Mary are ofirun with needles. It seems to take most of the next year to finally get them gone. That is about as long as it takes to get rid of all the unwanted relatives who delight in surprising them with unexpected visits!

Etymology: Overrun (infested with;invaded by) & Fir (a coniferous evergreen, popular as a Christmas Tree.

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Conifirmentation

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: kon if fer men tay shun

Sentence: It started the moment the Christmas Tree and the In-laws had arrived at the same time, a week before Christmas. The conifirmentation process. Tree needles everywhere and verbal needles about the food, the decor, the drinks, the gift choices, etc. At least the fir needles knew when to depart the host branch, unlike the In-laws, who thought that all could benefit from their "suggestions" and constructive criticism. "Next Year", she said to her husband, "We buy the air tickets for them and make sure that they are only here for a few days, not the current one month long visit!" Houseguests, as they say, are like fish...after a few days they start to smell.

Etymology: Conifer (any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones) & Fir (any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; often used for Christmas Trees) & Fermentation ( a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substances; especially, the anaerobic breakdown of sugar into alcohol;be in an agitated or excited state;go sour or spoil)

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