Verboticism: Festifanatic

'Isn't it a bit early to be wearing Christmas decorations?'

DEFINITION: n., A person so enamored with the holidays that they don't just deck their halls and home, but they also decorate their car, their cubicle, their pets, and themselves. v., To obsessively decorate according to seasonal holidays.

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Festifanatic

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Trimeister

petaj

Created by: petaj

Pronunciation: trim - my - ster

Sentence: Arnold particularly enjoyed the last third of the year. This was the time when he drew up his plans, sourced his decorations and finally garlanded, lit, trimmed and festooned all his hangouts.

Etymology: trim (decorate) + meister (master) + trimester (third term)

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Festoonatic

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: fes too nat ik

Sentence: he was such a mad festoonatick he tied some sleigh bells on his duck christmas quackers!

Etymology: festoon, lunatic

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COMMENTS:

Fantastic and funny - silveryaspen, 2008-12-09: 11:06:00

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Tinselfitter

Created by: durananrananran

Pronunciation: tin-sul-fit-ter

Sentence: Molly is such a tinselfitter, every December she outfits her desk in tinsel and baubles. She tinselfits out the rear window of her car with fairy lights

Etymology: tinsel + fitter

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Holifanorator

Created by: lelia

Pronunciation: holi-fan-o-rator

Sentence: She is such a holifanorator that she has lost count of all of her decorations!

Etymology:

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Santaclaustricphobia

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: San + ta + closs + trik + PHOE + bya

Sentence: Mildred's Santaclaustricphobia had become so severe that her family, coworkers and neighbors had come to dread the Christmas season.

Etymology: Santa Claus + phobia

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COMMENTS:

well done! - galwaywegian, 2007-12-03: 07:59:00

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Preposterxmas

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: pripästəreksməs

Sentence: Holly's approach to the holidays is truly preopsterxmas. It was bad enough last year when she started wearing a string of lights and couldn't leave her cubicle without trailing extension cords behind her but this year she is festooned with sprigs of holly and ornaments. She is a hazard to be around.

Etymology: preposterous (utterly absurd or ridiculous)+ Xmas (informal term for Christmas)

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Flashobishionist

Created by: stumpthepensicle

Pronunciation: flash o bition ist

Sentence: Not only was he a braggard but he was also flashobishionist during the Holiday seasons.

Etymology:

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Bauballer

Created by: silveryaspen

Pronunciation: Bah ball er

Sentence: Miss L Toe, the lady snowman loved Christmas. She had a ball (well actually, she had three very nice ones) buying lots of Christmas balls. She used them for buttons instead of lumps of coal, and even for her eyes and nose. Miss L Toe put them on the trees, hung them from the street lights, car antennas, any where to please. She pinned them on the jackets of all who came to see her, too. She was the greatest bauballer of all

Etymology: BAUBLE, BALL, ALL, ER Bauble - synonym for decoration. Ball - round Christmas ornaments, also means to have fun as in have a ball (and any sexual connotations I leave to your imaginations). All - everthing and everyone as in where she put them. Er - a suffix meaning somebody who performs a particular action.

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Festidious

Created by: teriaki

Pronunciation: fe-STID-ee-uhs

Sentence: She went about the house hanging each ornament with festidious care.

Etymology: L. festus (festival) + L. taedium (wearisome or tedious state)

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Baubleaphilia

Created by: MrOdd

Pronunciation: A bauble was originally a stick with a weight attached, used in weighing, a child's toy, but especially the mock symbol of office carried by a court jester. "Philia" (Greek: φιλíα) in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is usually translated "friendship"

Sentence: A friendly relationship with baubles and decorations for any excuse, maybe even a holiday, a love of permutating one's individuality into value induced soley by a passing occasion and it's rendering of traditional, and therefore mindless, decorations.

Etymology: Bauble + philia

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