Verboticism: Bauballer

'Isn't it a bit early to be wearing Christmas decorations?'

DEFINITION: n., A person so enamored with the holidays that they don't just deck their halls and home, but they also decorate their car, their cubicle, their pets, and themselves. v., To obsessively decorate according to seasonal holidays.

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Bauballer

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Celebraddict

Carla

Created by: Carla

Pronunciation: Noun: seh-leh-brA-dikt Verb: seh-leh-bruh-dIkt

Sentence: Noun: The celebraddict forbade the others from approaching the Christmas tree - she alone knew where the baubles should hang. Verb: Her compulsion was such that she took tinsel everywhere, needing even to temporarily celebraddict her seat on the bus.

Etymology: Celebrate + Addict

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Ornamaximental

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: or - nah - max - e - men - tal

Sentence: As I drove through the snowy, picturesque streets of my home town, coming back to spend the holidays with the family, I turned the corner and could see my childhood home. My mom had gone all ornamaximental again. Our home cast a halo of light which could be seen over the top of the hill. There must have been 20,000 lights everywhere, inluding trees, bushes, lawn decorations and even figurines on the roof. It was the same way when I was a kid. Our house glowed for Halloween, Thanksgiving, Easter, July 4th and sometimes even Valentine's Day.

Etymology: This word has several other words incorporated. Ornamental has maxi inside of it. Also, ornate and ornament are prefixes. In the middle are max, maximum. Also as a suffix, mental can be added to signify someone who is a bit "over the top". Ornate (elaborately ornamented, often to excess; flashy, flowery or showy) Ornament, Ornamental (a decoration, serving the purpose of decoration or beauty ) + Maximum (the largest possible quantity) + Mental (Mind, the collective aspects of intellect and consciousness, affected by a disorder of the mind)

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COMMENTS:

Very nice etymology, especially the mentality of it all. - silveryaspen, 2008-12-09: 11:04:00

Maximental sentimental! Great word - Nosila, 2008-12-09: 23:15:00

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Hollydaze

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: hälēdāz

Sentence: Becky believes in the organic lifestyle. With Christmas coming she has decided to festoon a festive vest with holly leaves. Nothing synthetic for her. No plastic, no satin. Becky is in a hollydaze. Maybe it is an effect of the season. Maybe it is the blood loss caused by her prickly apparel.

Etymology: holly (a widely distributed shrub, typically having prickly dark green leaves, small white flowers, and red berries) + daze (make someone unable to think or react properly) play on Holidays

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Dazzlejock

Created by: AliA415

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Fesquinoxaphrenic

Created by: MichaelCampbellUK

Pronunciation: fes-kwe-nox-a-fre-nic

Sentence: Ursula's fesquinoxaphrenia drove her like some crazed clockwork squirrel to stockpile the seasons baubles.

Etymology: Fes- (from festive) -quinox (from equinox, a seasonal event) -aphrenia (hebaphrenia, mental illness characterised by extreme hoarding). See 'fesquinoxafrenic' N.

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Christpulsiveness

Created by: IllmaticKD

Pronunciation: Christ'puls'iv'ness

Sentence: A bow on the hood of the car, the cat looks like Santa Claude vomitted, even the sweater she wears ha christmas bulbs hanging from it, this person suffers from Christpulsiveness.

Etymology: noun; Derived from two words. Christmas, and compulsive. Also see: Christpulsive, Christpulsively

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COMMENTS:

Korinne KD, put some of your magic into the sentences... I need a laugh!!! - Korinne, 2007-12-06: 00:15:00

Korinne Love it! - Korinne, 2007-12-06: 08:45:00

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Preposterxmas

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: pripästəreksməs

Sentence: Holly's approach to the holidays is truly preopsterxmas. It was bad enough last year when she started wearing a string of lights and couldn't leave her cubicle without trailing extension cords behind her but this year she is festooned with sprigs of holly and ornaments. She is a hazard to be around.

Etymology: preposterous (utterly absurd or ridiculous)+ Xmas (informal term for Christmas)

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Wreathflex

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: reeth/flex

Sentence: Once the first snowflake has fallen it is an automatic wreathflex to bedeck and festoon everything within eyesight with garlands and bows and silver bells...ahhh gives me goosebumps. 'deck the halls with boughs of holly, fa la la la la la la la la'

Etymology: wreath + reflex

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COMMENTS:

Clever create and Christmas carolling for our delight - silveryaspen, 2008-12-09: 11:08:00

Incredible. - nickmarziani, 2008-12-09: 11:52:00

BRILLIANT!! EASILY ONE OF THE BEST WORDS THIS MONTH!!! - Stevenson0, 2008-12-09: 17:38:00

We are wreathed in smiles... - Nosila, 2008-12-09: 23:19:00

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Decomaniac

Created by: snekorb

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Decorat

karenanne

Created by: karenanne

Pronunciation: DEK o rat

Sentence: Val Egurl was that special form of mallrat, the "Decorat." She obsessively purchased every holiday-themed item that she deemed to be "cute." She could no longer park in her garage because it was stuffed full of boxes, carefully labeled and color-coded for each major and minor holiday. She festooned both her house and herself with decorations for the relevant occasion. She even had lights up on her house year-round. But not just any lights - these were multicolored and synchronized to music, AND both the colors and the music corresponded to the holiday. On the Fourth of July, the lights were red, white, and blue, and the Star-Spangled Banner and other patriotic songs played. On Halloween, the lights were orange and black, and spooky music emanated. Not to mention Christmas - well, you get the idea.

Etymology: decorate + rat

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COMMENTS:

deco-rat-ive word! - Nosila, 2009-12-15: 01:13:00

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