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'I guess Bob isn't going to get his pension...'

DEFINITION: v. To expire, pass away or kick the bucket while at the office; often occurs when someone is overworked, underpaid, and desperately trying to hang on for a full pension. n. A person who has been suddenly, and permanently, terminated while a work.

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Verboticisms

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Diehardworker

Created by: kateinkorea

Pronunciation: DIE HARD WOR ker

Sentence: “Death by deadlines” was what they wrote on his tombstone. But Charles’s dead end job became the death of him. Charles was always working hard while those around him were hardly working. His diehard devotion to his hard work ethics made him the diehardworker of the year…when he retired permanently of a heart attack.

Etymology: DIEHARD: Firmly, often unreasonably immovable in purpose or will HARDWORKER: Someone who works hard DIE:

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COMMENTS:

Excellent etymology! Excellent verbotomy! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 11:07:00

and if you believe in reincarnation you could have diehardworker2 - Jabberwocky, 2009-03-30: 12:46:00

Awesome word - especially the "death by deadlines" and " working hard while others were hardly working"! - ha ha, sad, though too. - splendiction, 2009-03-30: 20:16:00

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Stifferstaffer

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: stif fer staf fer

Sentence: When Bob keeled over at his desk, while on his computer, he gave a whole new meaning to the word "terminal". He had worked hard, too hard and with only a year to retirement, he should have been winding down, not taking on more work. He expired instead of retired. He was now a stifferstaffer. Now there would be stiff competition for his job and the plot thickens... Like vultures on some hapless carrion, his team-mates swooped his desk to claim his supplies and earthly utensils. They picked it clean in five minutes. When the boss came out of his office to investigate, he shouted at them all, "Can't you buzzards wait until they take Bob away first??"

Etymology: Stiffer (more rigid;more dead) & Staffer (an employee, someone paid to do a job)

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COMMENTS:

Your mind certainly comes to terms with wit and humor, even when writing about the 'terminal' ... I may never sit, with ease, at one again! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 11:22:00

Your end of the lines and verbotomy are top of the line! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 11:24:00

Cheers, silvery...the end justifies the means! - Nosila, 2009-03-30: 22:17:00

metrohumanx Nice, concise, precise! - metrohumanx, 2009-03-31: 02:29:00

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Myocardialinfraction

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: my-oh-card-yal-in-FRACK-shun

Sentence: Elwood committed the ultimate myocardialinfraction by having a fatal heart attack mere weeks before he was to have gained eligibility for a comfortable retirement package.

Etymology: Blend of 'myocardial' (relating to the tissue of the heart) and 'infraction' (breach; violation; infringement) -- a word play on the medical term myocardial infarction.

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COMMENTS:

nice combo - Jabberwocky, 2009-03-30: 12:51:00

I wonder if they docked his last paycheck for this "infraction" - mweinmann, 2009-03-30: 16:37:00

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Deadicated

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: dedikātid

Sentence: Everybody thought Bob was a dedicated worker. He was in his office when people arrived in the morning and there when they left. Last week they discovered that he was a deadicated, desiccated worker. His bosses now have the difficult task of determining just when he passed away and how much pay should be retrieved from his estate.

Etymology: dead (no longer alive) + dedicated (devote time, effort, or oneself to a particular task or purpose)

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COMMENTS:

:) - galwaywegian, 2010-10-12: 06:43:00

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Exitploitation

Created by: splendiction

Pronunciation: ex it ploy tay shun

Sentence: Poor Bob, as it actually turned out, had accepted the clerk's position as a deadendtry level job. For most of his life, he desklaboured in the sweaty, dimly-lit office for long hours, short pay, with dreams of his retirement. His exitploitation came with a stroke after realizing he'd wasted pension savings on shares in the flailing company.

Etymology: From exploitation (disuse a huge portion of the populus to increase the wealth of few) and exit (leave, or in this case, die).

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COMMENTS:

So true and sad that it happens more than it should. Exitploitation's meaning is so readily apparent and has a powerful impact immediately. Greate Creation! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 19:25:00

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Dieretiring

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: di + ree + tire + ing

Sentence: To dieretiring is to keep working way past the time that you should mentally and physically just to try to collect more money at retirement.

Etymology: Die, Dire, Retiring, "Die Trying".....

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COMMENTS:

ooh - know a few of those - Jabberwocky, 2009-03-30: 12:46:00

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Oreyepeefortyfive

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: orr eye peee for tee fye v

Sentence: Gecko smiled as the oreyepeefortyfive was carried past his office. Another saving for the pension fund

Etymology: R.I P. P.45

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Employded

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: em-ploi-ded

Sentence: Ralph worked on the overnight crew. His co-workers knew he often stayed beyond his prescribed time. What they didn't know was that Ralph had passed from employed to employeded, from a member of the graveyard shift to a graveyard stiff. If Mary hadn't gone to Ralph's office to retrieve her stapler, he might still be there still.

Etymology: employed (having a job) + dead (deceased)

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Expirouette

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: ex/peer/oo/et

Sentence: The aging ballerina was determined to dance until her dying day and thus it was very appropriate that her swan song came as an expirouette while teaching a group of young dancers how to spin.

Etymology: expire + pirouette

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COMMENTS:

does that make her an expirimaballerina? good concept - galwaywegian, 2009-03-30: 07:08:00

My! My! How incredibly well you turn a phrase! Amazing how you can take an appalling situation and create such an appealing word! Maybe because it was such a graceful exit. Outstanding! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 11:17:00

Expirouette played around in my mind all day ... along with the line of that great 60's song "To everything there is a season, Turn. Turn. Turn" - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 19:08:00

(From Eclesiastes...) With a time to dance and a time to die, Silvery! - readerwriter, 2009-03-30: 19:12:00

Yes, readerwriter the song is based on that Biblical verse! - silveryaspen, 2009-03-30: 19:17:00

TuTu much, JW! And if she fell on the stage she'd be a ballet slipper! - Nosila, 2009-03-30: 22:10:00

This must be where the term "corpse de ballet" originated! - Nosila, 2009-03-30: 22:20:00

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Exexecutive

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: eks eks ek yew tiv

Sentence: John went from clerk to supervisor to senior supervisor to junior executive, to senior executive to exexecutive in four years two months, a record in the department. Nobody knew hie surname.

Etymology: executive, ex

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COMMENTS:

work will kill you - Jabberwocky, 2009-03-30: 12:47:00

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Comments:

silveryaspen - 2009-03-30: 02:06:00
Song of the Day: "Take this Job and Shove It" ... or should that be shovel it?!!!

Verbotomy Verbotomy - 2009-03-30: 07:18:00
Shovel it, about six feet under ~ James