Verboticism: Ufirzt

'Thank goodness Rodney went first'

DEFINITION: v. To generously allow others to precede you in hopes that they will identify, reduce, and perhaps be eliminated by, the potential hazards. n. A gesture of courtesy which is really the lead-in to a trap.

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Ufirzt

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Deathiquette

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: dett ee ket

Sentence: His sense of deathiquette had won him many admirers, and kept all of his detractors silent.

Etymology: etiquette, death

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COMMENTS:

Morbid, but descriptive. - Clayton, 2007-06-26: 10:57:00

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Hostiletality

Created by: terpette

Pronunciation: hostile-TAL-ity

Sentence: Letting me jump off the cliff first when we go to the quarry to swim is just another example of my ex-boyfriend\'s hostiletality!

Etymology: Conjunction of \"hostile\" and \"hospitality\".

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Pitfool

Created by: ziggy41

Pronunciation: Pit-fewl

Sentence: Before tasting the coffee, I pitfooled my wife by offering her a sip to make sure it wasn't too hot to drink. It turned out it was.

Etymology: Pitfall (a danger) + fool (a gullible or dumb person; to trick such a person)

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COMMENTS:

you sound like a pitfool terr(i)or - galwaywegian, 2007-06-26: 06:20:00

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Baitenhookish

Lapper

Created by: Lapper

Pronunciation: BATE-en-HOOK-ish

Sentence: Ralph noticed the unavoidable rope trap ten feet in front of the fresh water spring, and baitenhookishly "let" James go to the spring before anyone else.

Etymology: Bait and hook

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Chivtrickalry

Created by: remistram

Pronunciation: shiv-trick-all-ree

Sentence: She fell for his chivtrickalry yet again. The meal he prepared for her was his best yet save for the rat poison aftertaste to the steak. Then she slowly passed out.

Etymology: chivalry (courteous behaviour, generous) + trick (as in trap, snare, lure)

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Hambush

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: hamboŏsh

Sentence: Aunt Edy invited Rodney over for Thanksgiving. She promised not just turkey but pork products. He accepted knowing full well that this was a hambush. Edy is the designated family inquisitor. Rodney’s new girlfriend was to be the topic of discussion for the evening. What’s her name? How old is she? Has she been married? Does she have kids? Where does she work? How did you meet? Is it serious? Rodney thought to himself, ”Why am I putting up with this?”. ”That’s right, HAM!!!”

Etymology: ham (meat from the upper part of a pig’s leg salted and dried or smoked) + ambush (a surprise attack by people lying in wait in a concealed position)

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Leurting

Created by: smilodon99

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Yellegate

Created by: ErWenn

Pronunciation: /ˈjɛləˌgeɪt/

Sentence: Any situation in which you willingly put someone else in the danger that you could have faced yourself is an example of yellegation.

Etymology: Yellow (as in afraid) + delegate

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Decoytesy

mrskellyscl

Created by: mrskellyscl

Pronunciation: de-coy-tes-y

Sentence: Micky was given a great decoytesy when he was tricked into putting a bell on the cat by the mayor of the mouse kingdom.

Etymology: decoy:a means to mislead or lead into danger; entrap + courtesy: given or done as a polite gesture

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Benevolentrap

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: buh-nev-uh-luhn-trap

Sentence: Denise was so happy to see that chivalry was alive when Ken held the door for her yesterday morning. It turned out to be a benevolentrap when it she found out that the boss was looking for someone to take care of a particularly cranky customer.

Etymology: benevolent (charitable, kind) + trap (snare, trick)

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