Verboticism: Explantriate

'Don't leave me out here! I'm not dead yet!'

DEFINITION: v., To put an unwanted houseplant, especially a seasonal or gift plant like a Poinsettia or Easter Lily, outdoors in hopes that it will die. n., An unwanted houseplant which has been left to nature.

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Croakus

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: crow kus

Sentence: she's trying to croakus, growled the tiger lily

Etymology: crocus, croak us

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Petalfeelia

Created by: porsche

Pronunciation: petal/feel/iya

Sentence: Petalfeelia occurs when people think their plants have feelings

Etymology: petal + feel

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COMMENTS:

I got it bad. - purpleartichokes, 2007-11-14: 18:33:00

BTW - love this word too! - purpleartichokes, 2007-11-14: 18:34:00

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Inplanticide

Created by: mplsbohemian

Pronunciation: in-PLAN-tih-syed

Sentence: The the rare variety of African violet that Alex had given his girlfriend was the victim of ruthless inplanticide.

Etymology: indoor + plant + infanticide (indicates helplessness)

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Floracide

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: FLOR-eh-side

Sentence: In a seemingly heartless attempt to commit floracide on an unwanted hideous tropical houseplant she had gotten as a gift, Gracie left it outdoors on the patio during the harshest part of the winter.

Etymology: 'Flora' (Plants considered as a group) with the suffix 'cide' (from Latin meaning “killer,” “act of killing,” used in the formation of compound words)

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Exofoliacizing

Created by: dubld

Pronunciation: eg-so-fo-fo-lee-ah-size-ing

Sentence: After living with the drooping easter lilly for a time, he decided it was time to exofoliacize his easter demon plant.

Etymology: exo (Out) + foliage (Plant) + Exorcize (Expel)

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Chrysanthenasia

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: krisanθənāzhə

Sentence: Lilly loves flowers. Unfortunately she has a black thumb. When her husband gave her a potted plant on her birthday it was an act of Chrysanthenasia.

Etymology: chrysanthemum (a popular plant of the daisy family, having brightly colored ornamental flowers) + euthanasia (the painless killing of a patient suffering from an incurable and painful disease or in an irreversible coma)

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Nevraindoora

Created by: emilylind

Pronunciation: Say never then in after door and finally a .

Sentence: This plant is a Nevraindoora .

Etymology:

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Exfloriate

Created by: amcfarlane

Pronunciation:

Sentence: Jack decided to exfloriate the grim-looking rubber plant his great aunt had purchased him for a house-warming present.

Etymology:

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Leafoutside

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: leef owt syde

Sentence: Like clockwork, Flora's neighbours saw the same phenomena after each season...abandoned plants on her back porch. Poinsettia's after Christmas, Lillies after Easter, Mums after Thanksgiving, etc. Apparently ignorant on any kind of plant care knowledge,Flora would leafoutside any of these poor hothouse-raised, sensitive showy plants to fend for themselves. Inevitably, snow, frost, critters and lack of water sealed their fate. Those neighbours were very worried that one of these days, Flora might get pregnant and have a baby. If she ran true to form, they were afraid they might find the baby abandoned on the porch because he had outgrown the cute stage and was way too much work and bother. They speculated that if this was not the child's fate, he should be named "Leaf the Lucky"!

Etymology: Leaf (the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants) & Outside (Not inside, in the elements) & play on leave outside (abandon something to the Great Outdoors)

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Deathpod

Created by: sipsoccer

Pronunciation: (death-pod)

Sentence: That plant looked like a deathpod when it was put outside.

Etymology: Death: When something, or someone dies. Pod: A part of a plant containing seeds.

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