Verboticism: Hieromedia

'Wow! Look what my grandpa gave me!'

DEFINITION: n. An old media format that is no longer popular or easily accessible, such as floppy disks, VHS tapes or stone tablets. v. To try to access data stored in an old-fashioned media format, especially it requires the use archaic technology and/or protocols.

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Obsolackss

petaj

Created by: petaj

Pronunciation: ob-sol-lacks

Sentence: Charmain looked forlorn after her best efforts at obsolackss failed to provide a workaround to access her family history data from the ancient shiny disc she discovered in the attic. If only Grandma had practised lockss.

Etymology: obsolete + hack + lockss (lots of copies keeps stuff safe - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LOCKSS)

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Hyperrelicate

Created by: arrrteest

Pronunciation: hayh-per-rel-i-cayt

Sentence: With blu-ray technology coming on, Devon pondered if he would have to move his massive CD collection to join his boxes of cassettes, LP's and 45's, and 8-track tapes. Feeling a bit nostalgic, he went to go look for the list of titles that he had packed away in the early 90's. To his dismay, he realized he wouldn't be able to find it because it was saved on a hyperrelicate: a floppy disk.

Etymology: hyper- over,beyond + relic- an object of the past + -ate, a Latin suffix occurring in nouns

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COMMENTS:

Like you, I have all those old relics and the devices for playing them them. If I took them out of storage I could fill an entertainment center with the museum pieces and charge the young ones to come play with it! Are we just a bit relicated? Superword! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-14: 18:07:00

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Archaicraftecision

Created by: garythesnail

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Retirosaur

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: ree ty ro sar

Sentence: When Mary reached 65, she knew it was time to stop working. She had become a retirosaur. She no longer spoke the language of her younger boss and co-workers. She could remember working the teletype, a comptometer and her ancient Underwood typewriter had served her well. She had used a dictionary, a thesaurus, knew how to spell; remember people's names; compose grammatically correct sentences and do complex mathematical computations in her head. The staff loved her, but found her to be a quaint walking, talking museum on legs. Yes, Mary had worked for 45 years at the same place and the reason she had been kept on this long was because she knew how to do each job well and she knew where all the bodies were buried!

Etymology: Retire (Withdraw from circulation or participation; cease to work) & Dinosaur (any of numerous extinct terrestrial reptiles of the Mesozoic era)

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COMMENTS:

"Retirosaur!" Just like the Little Red Hen, let Mary say "Not I!" It's sad we can't make the good things that are in the past, more a part of the good things in the present ... glean the best of the both! - silveryaspen, 2009-01-07: 15:48:00

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Grampaphone

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: gram pa fone

Sentence: The boys loved going to visit Grampa, because he had so many neat old-fashioned gizmos that they had never seen before. One of their favourites was the grampaphone. It was a gramophone that played very old songs on 78 rpm records. It needed wound up all the time. Their parents were amazed that the boys knew the words to very old vaudeville, burlesque and music hall songs. They knew all the songs recorded by Al Jolson, Gracie Fields, George Formby, Edith Piaf, Rudy Vallee and Fats Waller among others. Their folks knew they spent too much time on the grampaphone, when they said goodbye to their teacher, Mrs. Jones. They would croon to her, "Toot-Toot-Tootsie goodbye, Toot-Toot-Tootsie, don't cry..."

Etymology: Gramophone (an antique record player; the sound of the vibrating needle is amplified acoustically) & Grampa (your father or mother's father; the affectionate term for a grandfather)

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COMMENTS:

artr A Grampaphone could also be that odd black plastic device that plugs into the wall and works like a cell with an anchor. - artr, 2010-05-24: 07:54:00

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Hitechniques

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: hīteknēks

Sentence: Rotary phones, transistor radios, 8-tracks, cassette players, VCRs, dial-up modems... Once the pinnacle of scientific genius, these marvels are now considered hitechniques, ancient relics of technology that has moved on. Some of them still function with a patchwork of adaptations. Most are only good for cannibalizing to keep others of their kind semi-functional.

Etymology: hitech (employing, requiring, or involved in high technology) + antiques (a collectible object such as a piece of furniture or work of art that has a high value because of its considerable age)

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Antechwhatee

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: ann teh wot eee

Sentence: the sound of the antechwhatee scratched along, every now and then receding so you could make out a strangulated voice crooning something about gramma.

Etymology: antiquity, tech, what

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COMMENTS:

What a witty clever pun! Nice one! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-14: 23:52:00

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Betafied

Created by: monkeyhouse

Pronunciation: bay-tuh-fy-d

Sentence: DVDs are being betafied by Blu-ray.

Etymology: "Beta-" from Betamax, "-fy" ending for "make/form into"

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Rusticording

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /ruhs-teh-kor-ding/

Sentence: George totally enjoyed bringing his 8-year-old son with him to help clean out Grandpa's attic — where Grandpa had stored all of his old electronics and rusticordings. Grandpa had been an avid technophile in his day and the attic was like an obsolete technology museum. When George showed him the Betamax and VHS video tapes, and explained that they were like DVD-R's, Nathan inpected them and asked where the lasers went. Then, when they got to the cassettes and 8-track tapes, George told Nathan that they were what people kept their MP3's on, and then he showed Nathan the rust-colored tape and demonstrated how it turned. Nathan wanted to know how people selected the song they wanted to hear, and so George had to explain Fast Forward and Rewind, while his son struggled with the archaic concept. The vinyl records were next, and when George showed him the groove on the record, and explained how you had to carefully position the needle so as not to scratch the record, Nathan just winced and said, "Wow, Grandpa really had it rough!"

Etymology: Rust[ic] - iron [ferric] oxide; also, a thin layer of ferric oxide was used in most magnetic tapes, floppy disks and early hard discs (Old German, rost "red") + Recording - storage device containing information (from Old French, recorder "testimony")

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COMMENTS:

Yeah, I can no longer play my rustaccordion either! - arrrteest, 2008-03-14: 12:04:00

Will use it a lot! Excellent word! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-14: 18:22:00

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Antiquatech

Created by: kateinkorea

Pronunciation: AN ti KWAY tek

Sentence: This pile of old computers, calculators and beta and VHS players can all go in the trash because they are antiquatech.

Etymology: ANTIQUATED: old-fashioned and no longer suitable for modern conditions. TECH: short form of technology

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COMMENTS:

So fun to say "An tick wa teck" ... sounds like the tick tock of the clock ... evokes that feeling that time passes it all by! - silveryaspen, 2009-01-07: 14:52:00

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