Verboticism: Namenesic

'Who's the lucky lady?'

DEFINITION: v. To be unable to remember the name of a person you are speaking to, even though you've had a long-standing, and perhaps even an intimate relationship. n. An inability to remember a person's name.

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Dejawho

Created by: brasstax82

Pronunciation: day-ja-who

Sentence: With a complete feeling of dread, Shawn was sure he new the person hugging him, but was coming down with a case of Dejawho.

Etymology: deja-vu: Felling of experiencing a situation previously before. Who- Common phrase used when seeing to properly identify an individual

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Schizoneuronimcident

Created by: amigamark

Pronunciation: skitso-nuro-nom-sident

Sentence: While testing his new invention (the ACME brain reader) on his grand - parents, Geoff discovered the existence of schizoneuronomcidents. This was highlighted when his grand mother asked "Jane, Paul, Andy, Julian, Chris, Peter, Brian, Clifford, Gerry.." then "Geoff" for a cup of tea!

Etymology: Schizo-SPLIT-neuro-BRAIN-nom-NAME-cident-INCIDENT

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COMMENTS:

Great etymology! Innovative blending. Sounds like a contagious mental condition! Unique and very clever! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 09:59:00

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Amigonesia

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: am ego nees ya

Sentence: When what's-her-name...oh, yeah, Julia was kissing what's-his-name, oh yeah, Julio, his friend, what's-his-name, oh yeah, Raoul, ask who is the lucky lady? At first, what's his name, oh yeah, Julio was stumped, but he got over his amigonesia and realized that it was indeed, what's her name, oh yeah, Julia, his wife. The affects of too much sangria and tequila, old age and what's it called, oh yeah, amigonesia, had taken their toll on what's his name, oh yeah, Julio. It was another game of what's-it-called, oh yeah, Geriatric Jeopardy in full swing.

Etymology: Amigo (Spanish for friend) & Amnesia (partial or total loss of memory)

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Tagsnag

Created by: kateinkorea

Pronunciation: tag snag

Sentence: I went to introduce my best friend to my mother and had a tagsnag. I just completely went blank.

Etymology: tag: used for name or identity snag: unforeseen problem or stumbling block

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COMMENTS:

metrohumanx Fresh aspect in TAGSNAG. I love it. Short and snappy, too. - metrohumanx, 2008-12-31: 01:12:00

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Moniklog

Created by: twocent

Pronunciation: mahn-e&-klog

Sentence: Despite their evening together only ten days prior, when he entered the room his smile sparked only moniklog.

Etymology: moniker: a proper name or nickname clog: stoppage or obstruction

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COMMENTS:

metrohumanx Great combination. Hahaha. - metrohumanx, 2008-12-31: 01:14:00

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Forgetphil

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: for get fil

Sentence: When George brought his friend, Phil, home, he was unaware that Phil already "knew" his wife Julia in the Biblical way. But Phil had had so many previous girlfriends that he could not recall Julia. He was forgetphil, like someone who drank too much Milk of Amnesia...

Etymology: Forget (not able to remember) & play on forgetful (not retentive)

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Cognomemnocrapula

Created by: CanadianAndyCapp

Pronunciation: Kog-no-mem-no-krap-u-la

Sentence: As one who suffers from this difficulty, I can assure anyone that the initial stages of momentary forgetfullness of names can easily develop into a case of nomemoriatrix and finally a full-blown state of cognomemnocrapula.

Etymology: Short form of Latin: Cognomen (name), Memoria (Memory), Crapula (Terrible) / Atrox (Bad)

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COMMENTS:

Double creations! Etymology latinations. Deep roots sprouting an astounding piar of words! Amazing! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:43:00

pair ... forgive me my fingerslips ... they need to learn to quit being too quick tipsy. - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:44:00

your word would fit in well to the music of "La cucaracha, cognomemnocrapula Ya no puede caminar - Jabberwocky, 2008-03-04: 13:12:00

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Appellesia

Created by: gelsomina17

Pronunciation: apple-ee-sha

Sentence: Monica suffered an acute case of appellesia when she ran into her high school boyfriend at a party.

Etymology: appellation + amnesia

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COMMENTS:

Good one....very much like 'namenesia ' - Mustang, 2008-12-30: 00:29:00

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Boggledencher

Created by: janefitzsimmons

Pronunciation: baaaaa-gul-den-cher

Sentence: Damn, she forgot Marty's name. What a boggledencher. (Sorry, two sentences)

Etymology: Well if you forget someone's name, your mind is BOGGLED. Also, when people age they tend to forget vital information, such as their grandchildren's names. Old people uses dentures. (OK dentures is not spelled dencher. I KNOW. but i liked the way it looked better.) Hence, boggledencher was born.

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Whodonym

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /hoo-do-nim/

Sentence: Jason always called his fiancee by pet names, such as "Sweetheart" or "Honey," and although her name was actually 'Mary Louise' all her friends just called her "Lou". So when he introduced her to his cousin before the wedding, he got a case of 'brain lock' and all he could think of were whodonyms. Then, at the chapel, when the priest asked, "Do you take Mary Louise to be your lawfully wedded wife?" Jason's nervous first response was to ask, "Who?". It was beginning to look like the honeymoon wasn't going to be as pleasant and relaxing as he'd hoped.

Etymology: Who - what person? (from Old English, hwā "who") + pseudonym - a fictitious or pen name (from Greek, pseudonymos "having a false name")

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COMMENTS:

I'll be using "brain lock" ... great pairing! A Whodlum hopes everyone, especially the cops, have brain lock and whodonyms? Innovative! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 19:11:00

Very creative: a real word! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:01:00

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