Verboticism: Cowcell

'Listen for the ring!'

DEFINITION: v., To call your cellphone when you have misplaced it, hoping that it will ring so that you can locate it. n., The sound of a lost cellphone.

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Cowcell

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Cellapper

Created by: kabloozie

Pronunciation: sel-LAP-per

Sentence: Whenever my cell phone is misplaced, I cellapper it, and voila! there it is, aglow in the black hole of my purse, or singing within the sofa cushions.

Etymology: cell: short for cell phone. The Clapper: a sound activated invention that switches on and off lamps.

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Crypthphon

Created by: ashrogers1734

Pronunciation:

Sentence: I must crypthphon quickly! My phone has been lost for days, try to listen for the ring!

Etymology: Crypth - hidden or secret Phon - sound or telephone

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Tonely

Created by: earljw

Pronunciation: tohn-lee

Sentence: When I called my cell I could hear its tonely sound coming from the pocket of my jeans. Now if I only knew where I left my jeans.

Etymology: tone + lonely

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COMMENTS:

nice word. brings back bad memories though - leechdude, 2007-11-09: 20:50:00

Celp! - purpleartichokes, 2007-11-10: 05:12:00

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Mobilunearth

Created by: Kevcom

Pronunciation: mao-bull-unn-err-th

Sentence: Mr. Jenkins mobilunearthed his Loserphone L535 by calling it systematically 7 times in a row while he was in different places about the house. Luckily, the phone wasn't on vibrate, but was on the lowest volume setting, and with Mr. Jenkins' 20/20 like hearing, it was no problem finding his L535.

Etymology: mobile cell + unearth (to discover)

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Cellalert

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: sell-uh-lert

Sentence: Unable to find his cell phone amidst the clutter Elwood sent himself a cellalert from his landline.

Etymology: cell (cell phone) + alert

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Purscellual

Created by: remistram

Pronunciation: per-sell-yu-uhl

Sentence: The piles of clothes and junk made for a difficult purcellual, luckily his dad had a metal detector.

Etymology: pursual (search) + cell (phone)

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Brrringtone

Created by: bookowl

Pronunciation: brrr/ing/tone

Sentence: A brrringtone is a feature for people who are prone to misplacing their phones.

Etymology: brrring (sound of phone ringing) + ring tone + bring

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COMMENTS:

Excellent...brrrring it on! - Nosila, 2008-10-08: 20:34:00

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Cellulocating

Created by: dubld

Pronunciation: sel-yu-LOH-keyt

Sentence: "Hey Mike!" "Shutup, I'm cellulocating and it's on vibrate."

Etymology: Cellular + Locating

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COMMENTS:

I think I should have said Self-cellulocating. Because regular cellulocating would happen when you get someone else to call your phone for you. - dubld, 2007-11-09: 09:32:00

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Diallocate

Created by: OZZIEBOB

Pronunciation: dahyl-LOH-keyt

Sentence: A teasing telenigma taunted Bob with the usual "notingaling" when he tried to diallocate and phonepoint his cellphone.

Etymology: 1. Dial & locate. 2. Notingaling (Pr. no-ting-a-ling): The sound of a lost (cell) phone. 3. Phonepoint: Based on phone & pinpoint.

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COMMENTS:

I love notingaling - Jabberwocky, 2007-11-09: 09:38:00

Wow, four great words! ...Gets my vote. - Tigger, 2007-11-09: 19:21:00

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Beacontone

Created by: Koekbroer

Pronunciation: bee-kon-tone

Sentence: Doug had specially programmed his cellphone to ring with a custom high-pitched tone when dialed from his landline. He called it a "beacontone" and was quite proud of it. The problem was that it was so high-pitched he couldn't hear it. He kept forgetting to reprogram it so whenever he lost the phone he would have to call the kid from next door to listen for it.

Etymology: beacon, tone

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