Verboticism: Equinoxious

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Equinoxious

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Pudjitters

Created by: iwasatripwire

Pronunciation: pudge-itters

Sentence: Just thinking about bikinis gives me the pudjitters

Etymology: pudgy + jitters

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Hibernationshock

Created by: cheetah

Pronunciation:

Sentence: Aunt Junipher experiences a depressing state of hibernationshock during the bikini sales each spring.

Etymology:

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COMMENTS:

I like it! - ErWenn, 2007-02-28: 11:57:00

me too! - wordmeister, 2007-02-28: 13:01:00

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Equinoxious

Created by: Alchemist

Pronunciation: eh-kwuh-NOKS-shush

Sentence: As Barb peered over her belly to read the scale she felt so equinoxious she had to sit down. She began to sob, "Damn, I KNEW I should've thrown those last dozen fruitcakes away!"

Etymology: equinox (first day of spring) + anxious with a side of noxious.

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Lardistress

Created by: Osomatic

Pronunciation: lar dih stress

Sentence: "Lardistress" means that sinking feeling you get when you realize you will be shedding your winter coat before you can possibly shed the fat you gained over the holidays.

Etymology: From the Old Norman "chubummer."

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COMMENTS:

wow! It means EXACTLY that! you got my vote for the sterling sentence~ - Alchemist, 2007-03-01: 00:26:00

petaj It's ironic that all that lard would actually make one more buoyant literally, but not figuratively. Not to mention the negative effect on the figure. - petaj, 2007-03-01: 05:04:00

Thanks, Alchemist. It's the sort of thing one can only get away with once, though. :) - Osomatic, 2007-03-01: 14:26:00

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Hibermodelosis

Created by: w5lf9s

Pronunciation: hy.ber.mo.del.oh.sis

Sentence: "I can't even see my toes when I'm standing on the scale" he whined. "Not unless you turn the light on", she replied flicking the switch. He was a clear case of hibermodelosis to her.

Etymology: The pathological need (psychosis) to get through the winter (hibernate)looking like a model and the resulting and unavoidable depression

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Disafatment

Created by: DoctorManhattan

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Expostfatto

Created by: Discoveria

Pronunciation: Ex-post-fat-toe

Sentence: Brenda was more blue than the blues, more down than the Downs, and more depressed than her mattress springs. She was experiencing the post-Christmas dieter's syndrome of expostfatto.

Etymology: From "ex post facto", a legal term referring to laws that change the legal status of events that happened before the law is enacted. (i.e. Hoping that the effect of overeating can be changed.)

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COMMENTS:

The mattress reference is hillarious!! - purpleartichokes, 2007-02-28: 06:42:00

Took me a while to think up...but I didn't want to get rid of the beginning of the sentence! - Discoveria, 2007-02-28: 07:49:00

Silly, but amusing. - ErWenn, 2007-02-28: 11:57:00

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Lipidowner

Created by: magenta

Pronunciation: li-pi-dau-ner

Sentence: I was on such a high today until I got on the scales - what a lipidowner that was.

Etymology: lipids(fats) + downer

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Obesery

Created by: ErWenn

Pronunciation: /ˌoʊˈbizɚɹi/

Sentence: When it gets you down, just remember that Santa's New Year's obesery has got to be worse than yours.

Etymology: From obese + misery

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Sheddread

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: 'shed-dred

Sentence: Once again facing the awful prospect of having to lose the winter fat she had stored up, Carmen had an almost overwhelming case of sheddread, not sure she could drum up the discipline needed to pull it off.

Etymology: Blend of 'shed' (v. to cast off or let fall - leaves, hair, feathers, skin, shell, etc - by natural process) and 'dread' (n. terror or apprehension as to something in the future; great fear)

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