Verboticism: Exesterfasation

'Isn't it a bit early to be wearing Christmas decorations?'

DEFINITION: n., A person so enamored with the holidays that they don't just deck their halls and home, but they also decorate their car, their cubicle, their pets, and themselves. v., To obsessively decorate according to seasonal holidays.

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Exesterfasation

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Unbelievabawble

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: unn bee leev a baw bull

Sentence: She was totally unbelievabawble as she jingled all the way to her workgrotto, merrily mincing her buns on her way back from refyuleing at the coffee dock.

Etymology: unbelievable, bauble

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COMMENTS:

Congrats on your 'minimaim' fame. Well deserved! - Stevenson0, 2007-12-03: 12:26:00

I like refyuleing as well - Jabberwocky, 2007-12-03: 13:01:00

Big congrats on getting published Galway! (And I personally know a bun-mincer.) - purpleartichokes, 2007-12-03: 19:20:00

Good on ya for success with "minimaim' - OZZIEBOB, 2007-12-04: 16:32:00

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Holiwhore

Created by: Tesher

Pronunciation: HOL-ih-hor

Sentence: Janice and Susan hate each other because they both try to out-holiwhore each other with bells, lights, and mistletoe.

Etymology: Holiday + Whore

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COMMENTS:

Korinne Hilarious :) - Korinne, 2007-12-03: 23:54:00

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Tinselclown

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: tinsəlkloun

Sentence: Gloria is such a tinselclown. She rarely has enough decorations for her Christmas tree because she is wearing most of them starting the day after Thanksgiving. Others call it Black Friday. She calls it Sparkle Friday. You should see her at Easter.

Etymology: tinsel (a form of decoration consisting of thin strips of shiny metal foil) + clown (a comical, silly, playful person) Derivative of Tinseltown (Hollywood, or the superficially glamorous world it represents)

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COMMENTS:

Yule (you'll) log in warmth and laughter with this excellent verbotomy - silveryaspen, 2008-12-09: 11:19:00

Very nice - OZZIEBOB, 2008-12-13: 16:11:00

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Decophile

robohamster

Created by: robohamster

Pronunciation: deck o file

Sentence: "I can't believe Susan decorated the toilet this year." "I know, she's a total decophile."

Etymology: pedophile decorate

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Christpulsiveness

Created by: IllmaticKD

Pronunciation: Christ'puls'iv'ness

Sentence: A bow on the hood of the car, the cat looks like Santa Claude vomitted, even the sweater she wears ha christmas bulbs hanging from it, this person suffers from Christpulsiveness.

Etymology: noun; Derived from two words. Christmas, and compulsive. Also see: Christpulsive, Christpulsively

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COMMENTS:

Korinne KD, put some of your magic into the sentences... I need a laugh!!! - Korinne, 2007-12-06: 00:15:00

Korinne Love it! - Korinne, 2007-12-06: 08:45:00

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Ornamaximental

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: or - nah - max - e - men - tal

Sentence: As I drove through the snowy, picturesque streets of my home town, coming back to spend the holidays with the family, I turned the corner and could see my childhood home. My mom had gone all ornamaximental again. Our home cast a halo of light which could be seen over the top of the hill. There must have been 20,000 lights everywhere, inluding trees, bushes, lawn decorations and even figurines on the roof. It was the same way when I was a kid. Our house glowed for Halloween, Thanksgiving, Easter, July 4th and sometimes even Valentine's Day.

Etymology: This word has several other words incorporated. Ornamental has maxi inside of it. Also, ornate and ornament are prefixes. In the middle are max, maximum. Also as a suffix, mental can be added to signify someone who is a bit "over the top". Ornate (elaborately ornamented, often to excess; flashy, flowery or showy) Ornament, Ornamental (a decoration, serving the purpose of decoration or beauty ) + Maximum (the largest possible quantity) + Mental (Mind, the collective aspects of intellect and consciousness, affected by a disorder of the mind)

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COMMENTS:

Very nice etymology, especially the mentality of it all. - silveryaspen, 2008-12-09: 11:04:00

Maximental sentimental! Great word - Nosila, 2008-12-09: 23:15:00

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Decoramus

Created by: schoolmarm

Pronunciation: dec/or/A/mus

Sentence: His past follies could have been forgiven, but his coworkers quailed when the resident decoramus showed up on St. Patrick's Day wearing nothing but a four-leaf clover.

Etymology:

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Tinselitis

Created by: porsche

Pronunciation: tinsel/I/tis

Sentence: Sue's tinselistis was so acute that they had to schedule an emergency tinsellectomy.

Etymology: tinsel + tonsillitis

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COMMENTS:

Congrats on your over all weekly win last week! Some great words!! Well done!!! - Stevenson0, 2007-12-03: 15:10:00

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Jinglejerk

Created by: Mindy1955

Pronunciation: 'jiŋ-gel-'jerk

Sentence: Christmas decorations a week before Thanksgiving, what a jinglejerk.

Etymology: Middle English direct result of the excesses of the 1970's

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Decorat

karenanne

Created by: karenanne

Pronunciation: DEK o rat

Sentence: Val Egurl was that special form of mallrat, the "Decorat." She obsessively purchased every holiday-themed item that she deemed to be "cute." She could no longer park in her garage because it was stuffed full of boxes, carefully labeled and color-coded for each major and minor holiday. She festooned both her house and herself with decorations for the relevant occasion. She even had lights up on her house year-round. But not just any lights - these were multicolored and synchronized to music, AND both the colors and the music corresponded to the holiday. On the Fourth of July, the lights were red, white, and blue, and the Star-Spangled Banner and other patriotic songs played. On Halloween, the lights were orange and black, and spooky music emanated. Not to mention Christmas - well, you get the idea.

Etymology: decorate + rat

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COMMENTS:

deco-rat-ive word! - Nosila, 2009-12-15: 01:13:00

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