Verboticism: Amnamenesia

'Who's the lucky lady?'

DEFINITION: v. To be unable to remember the name of a person you are speaking to, even though you've had a long-standing, and perhaps even an intimate relationship. n. An inability to remember a person's name.

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Amnamenesia

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Blancognize

Created by: doseydotes

Pronunciation: ˈblaŋk-og-nīz

Sentence: Biff squinted his eyes at the man, wondering who the gorgeous hunk could be. "YOU DOLT! How can you blancognize your own IDENTICAL TWIN BROTHER?!" the beautiful stranger bellowed.

Etymology: Blanc, from the Latin root blanco, or blonde, meaning, idiot; Cog, from Lego, an oblique reference to the spinning of the world and each of us being but a tiny anonymous piece of the whole; and lastly, Nize, from Nordic, meaning the pleasure of ignorance.

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COMMENTS:

hilareous etymology; you made that up, didn't you? - stache, 2008-03-04: 16:16:00

Your sentence left me laughing, but your etymology has me roaring with laughter! Great word associations ... heck ... great mind associations! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 17:03:00

Since you liked my goofy humor,you might wanta check out my blog: www.cindysslouch.blogspot.com - doseydotes, 2008-03-04: 17:16:00

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Palzheimers

Created by: OZZIEBOB

Pronunciation: palsz-HI-merz

Sentence: When Bob couldn't remember the names of his five former partners and his ten children, the judge wondered whether he was suffering from palzheimers, or that his namewashing was just a last-hitch attempt to avoid palimony.

Etymology: Blend of PAL: close friend, confidante etc & ALZHEIMERS: Used in the familiar and jocular sense for memory loss.

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COMMENTS:

Ach! You beat me to the Alzheimer's! (so to speak!)Well done, love your word. - Jamagra, 2008-03-04: 08:54:00

Good word. Kind of a sad idea, though. - ErWenn, 2008-03-04: 09:56:00

The opposite of palzheimers might be wisenheimers! Palzheimers might be a form of palsy of the brain! Your word is so evocative of so much! Stunningly great! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:20:00

a classic!! - galwaywegian, 2008-03-04: 12:11:00

excellent Ozzie - Jabberwocky, 2008-03-04: 13:03:00

Sweet! - purpleartichokes, 2008-03-04: 18:16:00

Unforgettable word, Bob! - Tigger, 2008-03-04: 18:34:00

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Neckonize

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: nek o nize

Sentence: Bernie had a problem in that he failed to neckonize any girl (okay, both of them) he had ever had a previous fling with and certainly could never remember their names. You'd think that might pose a problem if he re-encountered the girl later and might feel a bit awkward. Truth is, any girl who ever did take up with him would never do it again and duck out of his line of vision. So, he never had to worry about remembering their names. Sad and lonely, that was Bernie.

Etymology: Ne -(Negative; Not) & Neck (to kiss, embrace, or fondle with sexual passion)& Recognize(be fully aware or cognizant of)

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COMMENTS:

Roared with laughter! Excellent word and etymology! - silveryaspen, 2008-12-29: 10:23:00

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Nilrecall

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: nil re kawl

Sentence: Joey had nilrecall when it came to people's names. When he eventually married and had twins, the baby boys were known as Thing 1 & Thing 2 to him...

Etymology: Nil (nada, nothing) & Recall (remember)

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Routinenile

Created by: Banky

Pronunciation: roo-teen-niyl

Sentence: Maybe it was the hangover from the two bottles of cognac in the hot tub the night before. Perhaps it was the countless lines of cocaine in the men's room with various twenty-something boys that morning. It could be loss of blood from a very large, very angry, and very white tiger that was mauling him at the moment. Whatever the cause of the sudden onset of routinenility, Roy could not remember his partner's exotic foreign name to call out for help.

Etymology: routine - familiar + senile - exhibiting a loss of cognitive faculties

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COMMENTS:

Your sentence reporting this incident was better than any I read in the media! Innovative etymology. Exceptionally creative word! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 09:54:00

Enjoyed the sentence; interesting word. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:00:00

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Babylabeler

picabomama

Created by: picabomama

Pronunciation: baby/label/er

Sentence: Aaron sounded fatherly and protective, but his wife knew that all the "honey", "sweetheart" & "baby" talk was really just a cover for his profound inability to remember a woman's name. He was a compulsive babylabeler.

Etymology: Baby- the most common name replacer + label

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COMMENTS:

I tried to come up with something along these lines, but buddyize, honeyify, and palform just don't roll off the tongue as well as babylabel. - ErWenn, 2008-03-04: 09:57:00

Wow! Sentence captures how annoying and offensive babylabelers are! Your word captures that feeling of being talked down to! Very apt creation! Simple but packs a wallop! Great create! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:15:00

Very true. Terms like mate, cobber, digger are often godsends for me! Unfortunately, Women's Lib has stamped out the use of luv, darl, etc. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 19:38:00

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Schizoneuronimcident

Created by: amigamark

Pronunciation: skitso-nuro-nom-sident

Sentence: While testing his new invention (the ACME brain reader) on his grand - parents, Geoff discovered the existence of schizoneuronomcidents. This was highlighted when his grand mother asked "Jane, Paul, Andy, Julian, Chris, Peter, Brian, Clifford, Gerry.." then "Geoff" for a cup of tea!

Etymology: Schizo-SPLIT-neuro-BRAIN-nom-NAME-cident-INCIDENT

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COMMENTS:

Great etymology! Innovative blending. Sounds like a contagious mental condition! Unique and very clever! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 09:59:00

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Dejawho

Created by: leegro

Pronunciation: /dey-zhah-hoo/

Sentence: As she walked down the aisle of the airplane, Sarah had a sinking feeling of dejawho. Hadn't she once drunkely groped the sweaty man in the aisle seat across from her?

Etymology: From "deja vu," which is French for "I'm not forgetful, I'm just self-absorbed," and "who," which should feel like a familiar word to most of you.

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COMMENTS:

What a twist ... a woman groping a man! But the twists in your etymology are even better! Insightfully Clever! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 17:14:00

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Nomduhplume

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: nom/duh/ploom

Sentence: It is difficult enough to remember names of old friends but getting together with a writer's group became a nightmare trying to remember their nomduhplumes.

Etymology: nom de plume (pen name) + uh? + duh

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COMMENTS:

Delightful! - silveryaspen, 2008-12-29: 10:15:00

Eggzellunt!! Wish I'd thought of it! - Mustang, 2008-12-30: 00:28:00

Clever - OZZIEBOB, 2009-01-04: 16:13:00

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Whodonym

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /hoo-do-nim/

Sentence: Jason always called his fiancee by pet names, such as "Sweetheart" or "Honey," and although her name was actually 'Mary Louise' all her friends just called her "Lou". So when he introduced her to his cousin before the wedding, he got a case of 'brain lock' and all he could think of were whodonyms. Then, at the chapel, when the priest asked, "Do you take Mary Louise to be your lawfully wedded wife?" Jason's nervous first response was to ask, "Who?". It was beginning to look like the honeymoon wasn't going to be as pleasant and relaxing as he'd hoped.

Etymology: Who - what person? (from Old English, hwā "who") + pseudonym - a fictitious or pen name (from Greek, pseudonymos "having a false name")

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COMMENTS:

I'll be using "brain lock" ... great pairing! A Whodlum hopes everyone, especially the cops, have brain lock and whodonyms? Innovative! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 19:11:00

Very creative: a real word! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:01:00

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