Verboticism: Barkcoding

'Now be a good boy, and pick up your socks'

DEFINITION: v. To use animal training techniques to improve and direct the behavior of other people. n. A technique which uses the principles of animal training to solve a human behavioral riddle.

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Barkcoding

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Crittersuade

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: CRIT-ehr-swayde

Sentence: Using techniques she'd learned as an animal trainer Roseanne often resorted to those methods with people and would try to crittersuade them to do things according to her wishes.

Etymology: Blend of critter and persuade

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Treaser

Created by: josje

Pronunciation: treaser

Sentence: i am a perfect treaser

Etymology: trainer en teaser

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Beaubedience

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: bōbēdēəns

Sentence: Jill believes in beaubedience. Her boyfriend knows how to behave because she has taught him well. Just last week when he spilled milk on the kitchen counter, she rubbed his nose in it and barked at him. At least she has given up smacking him with rolled-up newspaper.

Etymology: beau (a boyfriend or male admirer) + obedience (compliance with someone\'s wishes or orders or acknowledgment of their authority)

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Barkcorrecting

Created by: Annelanda

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Behandle

Created by: melodydrama

Pronunciation: bih-hand-uhl

Sentence: With some practice Jenny learned to successful behandle her boyfriend using a dogtrainer's guide.

Etymology: behave+handle

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Folklured

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /fohk-loord/

Sentence: Sherry wasn't what you'd call 'book-smart' but she was very good at figuring out what people's motivations were, and which tactics would make them act the way she wanted. She had folklured her boyfriend into a marriage proposal, her parents into buying her another new car, and even her teachers into giving her good grades — now she was about to graduate college, thanks to another student, who was also her enamoured and very lonely tutor. She was definitely going to either work in sales, or in politics.

Etymology: from the word 'Folklore': Folk - people in general, or people of a distinct group (from German, volk "people") + Lured - tempted or enticed into a particular action; used a decoy for fishing or trapping (from Middle Low German, loder "bait")

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COMMENTS:

She must have folklured her parents into buying her a new folkswagen! - Nosila, 2008-05-19: 16:56:00

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Poochnique

Created by: OZZIEBOB

Pronunciation: POOCH-neek

Sentence: "If you have something to say." Roxie barked, "shut up." She hoped that her poochniques would make Bob think that he had a dog for a wife, and he would forever remain her best friend.

Etymology: Blend of POOCH: slang for dog; etymology unknown, could be from German "Putzi" a name for a lap-dog?? & TECHNIQUE.

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Circusitous

Created by: bookowl

Pronunciation: sir/cus/i/tus

Sentence: I used a circusitous route but the leash worked wonders for keeping the kids in check.

Etymology: circus + circuitous (devious)

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Spousebreak

Created by: skeeterzirra

Pronunciation: rhymes with housebreak

Sentence: If all men are dogs, where's a man-whisperer to teach women how to spousebreak them?

Etymology: Housebreak

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Pavlover

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: pav lov er

Sentence: In order to break her husband Ivan of his sock-dropping habits, Anna rewarded him with love in order to get him to respond. She was a pavlover and if he still didn't learn to pick up his socks, she had to become a pavtufflover. But enough about their socks life...

Etymology: Pavlov (Russian physiologist who observed conditioned salivary responses in dogs (1849-1936)) & Lover (a person who loves or is loved)

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