Verboticism: Firiends

'Why are you vacuuming the Christmas tree?'

DEFINITION: n., 1. A pine needle infestation, common during and after the holiday season. 2. Prickly Christmas guests who will not leave and cannot be cleaned up. v., To fall down during a holiday party and hide under a rug.

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Firiends

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Needlenettle

MrDave2176

Created by: MrDave2176

Pronunciation: nee-dl-net-tl

Sentence: Marla and Jack used the DirtDevil to once again pick up the needlenettle under the tree. Despite using the latest in needle-retention technology, the tree insisted on dropping them. Jack finally had to agree it was time to dispose of the old artificial tree.

Etymology: needle (to annoy or pick on) + nettle (to aggravate or haunt)

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Conifirmentation

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: kon if fer men tay shun

Sentence: It started the moment the Christmas Tree and the In-laws had arrived at the same time, a week before Christmas. The conifirmentation process. Tree needles everywhere and verbal needles about the food, the decor, the drinks, the gift choices, etc. At least the fir needles knew when to depart the host branch, unlike the In-laws, who thought that all could benefit from their "suggestions" and constructive criticism. "Next Year", she said to her husband, "We buy the air tickets for them and make sure that they are only here for a few days, not the current one month long visit!" Houseguests, as they say, are like fish...after a few days they start to smell.

Etymology: Conifer (any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones) & Fir (any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; often used for Christmas Trees) & Fermentation ( a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substances; especially, the anaerobic breakdown of sugar into alcohol;be in an agitated or excited state;go sour or spoil)

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Holidazed

Created by: silveryaspen

Pronunciation: holly dazed

Sentence: Like a good shepard, we watered the flock on our tree. Yet, flocks of needles fell to the floor. Prickly pairs of party animals, all spruced up, rollicked fir hours, drooping into the pine droppings. They eventually decked the halls, wherever they fell, not even aroused by herds of belles. All (people and trees) were thoroughly holidazed.

Etymology: Holidays, Dazed

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COMMENTS:

Clever - OZZIEBOB, 2008-12-18: 04:11:00

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Barbedlier

Carla

Created by: Carla

Pronunciation: barbd-lie-uh

Sentence: 'Beware the barbedlier on the sofa', Marge whispered to her husband as she passed him in the doorway. 'Your friend Tom had to stay for a week the last time he was this sozzled'.

Etymology: barbed wire + lier (one who lies down)

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Pilemonkey

Created by: xirtam

Pronunciation: pahyl-muhng-kee

Sentence: Ouch! I stepped on another pilemonkey. I thought we got all of those pine needles out of the carpet. ... Dan became a pilemonkey after he got drunk at our New Years party, and slept it off wrapped in the carpet from our foyer.

Etymology: pile: as in carpte pile + Monkey: a person likened to such an animal, as a mischievous, agile child or a mimic. OR Monkey: a burdensome problem, situation, hindrance.

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COMMENTS:

tonii will you need a pilemonkotomy to get the needle out? - tonii, 2007-12-17: 22:56:00

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Holidossus

Created by: Johnhicks

Pronunciation: Hol-y-Dos-sus

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Firiends

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: fir - ee - ends

Sentence: It had been a wonderful holiday season. Sidney was thinking back to the parties, gifts and good cheer, as he took down the tree. As usual, there were needles all over the carpet. They had begun to feel like old, familiar firiends, he thought. Many of the needles would remain woven in and under the rug for years, along with the holiday guests who had fallen and disappeared there as well.

Etymology: This word is a combination of several... Fir (Species of evergreen conifer) + Friends (people you know well and regard with affection and trust) + ends (needles are the "ends" of the tree, and the holiday season has ended.

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COMMENTS:

So a thick coat of needles onm the rug would be a fir coat? Great Word...as soon as I saw it I heard the theme from"Friends" in my head...and now I cannot get it to go away! - Nosila, 2008-12-18: 20:43:00

And the furry ends are what remains. - dochanne, 2008-12-18: 22:08:00

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Pernoydles

metrohumanx

Created by: metrohumanx

Pronunciation: PURR-noy-dulls

Sentence: Barbara O'Reilly and Keith attempted to remove the PERNOYDLES which spread thru the house like invasive Zebra Mussels, crowding out the native dustballs. Each holiday season, the PERNOYDLES from down the street always stayed until the last dregs of mead were consumed, and the last tasteless limerick recited. During the evening, one guest got a severe attack of the PERNOYDLES and couldn't be located for hours. Last year, we had to drag them out of the sewers and send a few home by taxicab. PERNOYDLES - a must to avoid.

Etymology: PERsistent+anNOY+neeDLES=PERNOYDLES....PERSISTENT:existing for a long or longer than usual holiday time or continuously,retained beyond the usual jolly period,degraded only slowly by the environment;Latin persistent-, persistens, present participle of persistere.....ANNOY:to disturb or irritate especially by repeated pseudo-festive acts or remarks,Middle English anoien, from Anglo-French anuier, ennoier, from Late Latin inodiare to make loathsome, from Latin in + odium hatred .....NEEDLES: a needle-shaped leaf,a slender pointed object resembling a needle,to harass or mock cruelly, to intentionally irritate ;Middle English nedle, from Old English nǣdl; akin to Old High German nādala needle, nājan to sew, Latin nēre to spin, Greek nēn.

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COMMENTS:

Linguistically detailed and PERcise. A PERleasure to PERuse! - dochanne, 2008-12-18: 01:35:00

OH HO! Nice etymology. Pernod (liquor) and needles was what first came to mind. - silveryaspen, 2008-12-18: 02:48:00

metrohumanx Thank you. An absinthesis from the wee hours of the morning. :) - metrohumanx, 2008-12-18: 17:32:00

metrohumanx If you want to REALLY laugh, check out the toys at goblertoys.com: - metrohumanx, 2008-12-18: 17:59:00

metrohumanx http://goblertoys.com/ - metrohumanx, 2008-12-18: 18:00:00

Crowding out the native dustballs, how pernicious! PERfect! - Nosila, 2008-12-18: 20:38:00

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Scornament

Created by: bzav1

Pronunciation: scorn a ment

Sentence: 1)I was constantly sweeping and vaccuuming the scornament around the tree before it punctured the kids' missiletoes. 2)Finally, after all the other guests had left, Johnson nodded off in mid sentence. We slipped off to bed, leaving him there amidst the holiday accoutrements, a snoring Christmas scornament.

Etymology: scorn + ornament

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Pinattaque

Created by: Lingoism

Pronunciation: pahyn-uh-tak

Sentence: Look after your Christmas tree with care if you don't want your home to be the next victim of pinattaque.

Etymology:

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