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Created by: ErWenn

Pronunciation: /ˈɪməˌfleɪtɚ/

Sentence: Those engaged in imiflatery should be careful not to mimic their targets too well, as even the most narcissistic person would probably hate themselves if they were able to see them from the outside.

Etymology: From imitate + flatter (as in "imitation is the sincerest form of flattery")

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Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: repp lick ayt

Sentence: she was such a CEOclone, spending all her waking hours replickating the VP, down to his facial tick. She had a major panic attack when he started to grow a beard.

Etymology: replicate as in copy, lick as in arse


was her name Kate? - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 14:31:00


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Created by: Greggie




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Created by: Jeaneai

Pronunciation: Like replicating. And then boss.

Sentence: My god, look at Tony. Wearing his fancy high heels and mini skirt. He's totally replibossing.

Etymology: Replicating and...boss

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Created by: artr

Pronunciation: stu-pli-ket

Sentence: By emulating his not-too-bright boss, the best he could hope for was to be a stuplicate.

Etymology: Stupid + Duplicate

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Created by: Clayton

Pronunciation: oh-PAR-uht

Sentence: Cornelius felt the need to auparrot Mr. Jenkin's tiresome soliloquies any time the mood struck him. Unfortunately, the mood only struck him in the shower.

Etymology: au pair + parrot


Hey Clayton, Rikboyee's character works for Mrs. Jenkins. A pairoboss! - purpleartichokes, 2007-06-14: 09:06:00

or maybe the two are a pairadox - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 09:54:00

Appairently, Rikboyee is challenging me to a duo. Pair for the course. Once I de-deuced it, I realized it was no yoke. I'm certain he would twin, and I'm far too young to dyad. Pairhaps we should drink from the ceremonial doublet instead. - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 11:28:00

but you are nursing a wounded soldier - or was that shoulder - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 11:46:00

Heheh. I'll have to shoulder this burden stoically, like a soldier without arms. - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 11:51:00

I suspect duplicity on someone's part, but perhaps I'm just splitting hairs. - purpleartichokes, 2007-06-14: 11:55:00

How dare you speak ill of my toeses! (Sound of crickets.) - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 11:59:00

wouldn't that be splitting heirs? - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 12:06:00

Hai! Dos puns of Claytons are real ni-slappers, but they deux seem a bit two forced tu me. At la-shtayim presented with an opportunity to make a total twee-b of myself and pun in as many languages as I can handle without having any iki, disgusting kaksi-dents. It-zwei-l and it's nasty, but I couldn't resist, an-dalawá-nt is tu make everyone groan at how terrible these puns èr. I've deliberately included 16 different languages, so you'll have to really be on your to's if you want to find them all. - ErWenn, 2007-06-14: 12:09:00

Wow! That was quite ErWenntertaining! - purpleartichokes, 2007-06-14: 12:17:00

You wenn, er... win. - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 15:15:00

whatever happened to Cassiusclayton? - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 15:51:00 - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 19:12:00

Whoops... looks like we can't post links. At least, not long ones. - Clayton, 2007-06-14: 19:12:00


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Created by: sanssouci

Pronunciation: ek o hed

Sentence: "Sara thought that Sally, her new manager was stylish, clever and beautiful. In a vain attempt to get Sally to notice her,Sara set about becoming an echohead. Maybe that would make Sally realise how similar the both were?"

Etymology: Echo - a sound heard again near its source after being reflected. 2. A Person who reflects or imitates another. mid-14c.,personified as a mountain nymph, from ekhe "sound." The verb is from 1550s. Head - a person at the top, to whom others are subordinate, as the director of an institution or the manager of a department, the boss

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Created by: grasshopper





for what it is worth this is not the word I wanted to use. I tried to go back a page and it saved this word. My actual word was appulatism,for what it's worth. - grasshopper, 2007-06-14: 10:39:00

You can change it! Click on your word, click on Edit, then, down the bottom you'll see Oops, I want to change the spelling (or something of that nature). (its in light lettering) - purpleartichokes, 2007-06-14: 10:46:00


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Created by: scrabbelicious

Pronunciation: Mime-mic-er-ie or mim-ic-ory. (col. var.)

Sentence: "They say imitation is the best form of flattery to deceivery but the amount of acting out and out mymickery that went on today was beyond the beyond, Mr. Bond", said Pauline.

Etymology: An overlapping mix of 0. Mimic, can be verb or noun, one who imitates or sends up another, to engage in such behaviour. 1. My, (possessive pronoun), which doubles as an expression of exasperation (my oh my!) 2. Mime, an art-form-of-expression which impersonates a frenchman locked in an imaginary glass box who eventually finds his way out by tugging on a rope. 3. Mick, meaning Irishman as Paddy "taking the mick" by impersonating ones character by winding up or taking the piss, taking the Michael. The -ery suffix just rounds off the whole ensemble, kit and kaboodle. Alright Jack?


Kiss me Kojac! - scrabbelicious, 2008-08-07: 05:02:00

I hate Mimes but I love your word, scrabby! - Nosila, 2008-08-07: 23:24:00

metrohumanx mmmmmmmmm- good one. - metrohumanx, 2008-08-08: 07:10:00


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Created by: rephil

Pronunciation: suk-UP-yoo-bus

Sentence: The unbearable irony was that while Karen was a suckupubus, her boss Keith's only identifying characterstic was that he was a brown-noser.

Etymology: succubus: a (female) demon that seduces humans; suck-up: one who tries to curry favour at every opportunity


good one! - Jabberwocky, 2007-06-14: 14:32:00

petaj Got my vote - you could have added boss in the etymology.. suck up your boss - suckupuboss. - petaj, 2007-06-14: 23:57:00


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Verbotomy Verbotomy - 2007-06-14: 01:10:00
Office politics. You know it's a game. You understand the players. You've got a strategy. Now it's time to take action with Timothy Johnson's GUST -- even if that means shaving your head. Today's definition was suggested by remistram. Thank you remistram and Timothy! ~ James

purpleartichokes - 2007-06-14: 18:10:00
Love the artwork today James! Very funny!

Verbotomy Verbotomy - 2007-06-14: 18:17:00
Thanks purple! And cheers to remistram for thinking of such a funny idea. ~ James

Verbotomy Verbotomy - 2007-06-14: 18:27:00
By the way, Robert J. Sawyer, winner of Hugo and Nebula best novel awards, will be our featured author at Verbotomy next week. More details to follow... Check out Rob's website at ~ James

Verbotomy Verbotomy - 2010-01-08: 00:44:00
Today's definition was suggested by remistram. Thank you remistram. ~ James

'Jennifer? You've changed your hairstyle! I like it!'

DEFINITION: v. To seek approval from your boss by emulating their style, mannerisms or affectations. n. A person who copies their boss's style in order to win favor.

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