Verboticism: Disbehave

'Honey, you just ran a red light!'

DEFINITION: v. To unintentionally encourage bad behavior by responding to it in a manner that incites even worse behavior. n. A response designed to stop bad behavior, which paradoxically produces more of it.

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Modifail

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: mod/i/fail

Sentence: As a teacher, I sometimes modifail when a student over reacts in a negative way to an attempted behaviour modifcation causing even further trouble in class.

Etymology: modify + fail

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Reverbirate

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: re-VERB-eye-rayt

Sentence: It seemed that whenever Cindy would try to motivate her husband, Charlie, to behave more civilly, her words would only reverbirate in some dark corner of his psyche and have the opposite effect with him responding in even more outrageous manner.

Etymology: blend of 'reverberate' (echo) and 'irate' (angry)

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Habetual

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: ha bet ual

Sentence: Joanie nagged at Chachi when he drove, which drove him insane. She failed to under stand that her habetual commentary on his poor driving habits made him a worse driver. It would have probably worked better if she had actually had a driving license of her own before passing such critiques on his driving skills...

Etymology: Habitual (commonly used or practiced; usual) & Abet (assist or encourage, usually in wrongdoing)

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Miscourage

Created by: jrogan

Pronunciation: mis-cur-rage

Sentence: Every time Sally miscouraged her boyfriend go slower, he went faster. It didn't matter whether they were on the highway, or in the bedroom.

Etymology: miss + courage as opposed to discourage

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Intentevior

Created by: Issunrai

Pronunciation: In-ten-tave-eeh-or

Sentence: "You're playing those video games too much," she said. "You're just being intentevior!" said her son.

Etymology: "Intent" from "unintentionally" and "evior" from "behavior."

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Contradick

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: käntrədik

Sentence: Katy has just about had it with her boyfriend. He is such a contradick. Whenever she suggests a change to his behavior, he re-doubles his bad behavior to prove his independence.

Etymology: contradictory (mutually opposed or inconsistent) + dick (slang: jerk)

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Dissuascalation

petaj

Created by: petaj

Pronunciation: dis-sway-sca-lay-shun

Sentence: Bobby, just ignore your brother. You know that when you tell him not to swear he just tells you to f&*$ #$%&&% )!!@^&$$. I know you mean well, but it's just a dissuascalation.

Etymology: dissuasion (discouragement) + escalation (increase, especially in the case of military escalation where every action is responded to with greater force)

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Goaddigrrr

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: gode/di/dur

Sentence: Sally's attempts at being a gold digger by encouraging her boyfriend to spend more money on her by telling him he reminded her of her favourite rock star backfired when she inadvertently became a goaddiggrr encouraging him instead to trash their apartment.

Etymology: goad + gold digger + grrr

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Reitirate

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: re-IT-eye-rayt

Sentence: While she was well intentioned Muriel would invariably overdo her prodding to get Stan to do things her way and in the end would almost always reitirate, harping on a topic until Stan would just blow his cork.

Etymology: Blend of reiterate and irate.

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Negatentional

mrskellyscl

Created by: mrskellyscl

Pronunciation: neg-a-ten-shen-al

Sentence: As a teacher, Mary knew that negatentional responses were equal to posintentional ones to the kids who acted up to get her attention, although the results were disastrous for her classroom management. She soon realized that by nagging Kevin the same result would happen, Kevin would do the opposite of what she wanted to get a response from her. She decided to ignore the inappropriate behavior and reward him for proper behavior, just as she would her kindergarten children, in order for him to get posattention from her.

Etymology: negative: unfavorable or disconfirming + intentional: done deliberately + attention: notice or recognition. Teachers and trainers understand that to some children or animals negative attention is just as good as positive attention because it gives them the reward of recognition and response.

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COMMENTS:

Do I not lie it? Negatory! Good word. - Nosila, 2009-06-30: 17:31:00

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