Verboticism: Micromangerment

'Don't tell me your trying to sneak out early?'

DEFINITION: n. A type of frustration created by a manager who never notices when you work late, but always nags you for leaving early whenever you leave on time. v. To carefully monitor your subordinates to ensure that they never leave work a minute early.

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Micromangerment

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Slackervise

Created by: stache

Pronunciation: slak'-ər-vīz'

Sentence: Fred's secretary Ethel had arrived seventy-seven seconds past her forty-minute allotted lunch period, so Fred made sure to slackervise even more diligently than usual to insure she made up the time at actual work before leaving for the evening; at her claimed typing speed of 110 wpm, that should work out to an extra 141.16667 words for the day.

Etymology: 'slacker,' less taut; 'vise,' device for holding objects firmly in place.

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COMMENTS:

Nice word! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-04-23: 17:50:00

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Micromangerment

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: micro/man/ger/ment

Sentence: Sue felt overwhelming micromangerment when her boss never saw the big picture but always obsessed about ridiculous aspects of the job like clock watching.

Etymology: micromanagement + anger

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COMMENTS:

Nice word: sorta has a "dog in the manger" feel about it! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-04-23: 17:42:00

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Nitticker

Created by: ErWenn

Pronunciation: /ˈnɪtˌtɪkɚ/

Sentence: I don't mean to be a nitticker, but when you say that my pizza will be here in 30 minutes or less, do you mean from now, or from the time I called?

Etymology: from nitpicker + tick (as in a clock)

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COMMENTS:

great word ErWenn - Jabberwocky, 2008-04-23: 14:46:00

Very good word. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-04-23: 17:48:00

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Hourgrass

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: our/grass

Sentence: Stan was the company hourgrass and would tattle on anyone who took a minute longer for coffee breaks or lunch. He had a special alarm that would sound if the door was opened before 5:00 p.m.

Etymology: hour glass + grass (as in tattle)

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COMMENTS:

Stan sounds like a grasshole! - Nosila, 2009-06-16: 10:48:00

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Snoopervise

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: Snew-per-vize

Sentence: Melody was definitely a hands on snoopervisor who monitored every aspect of her subordinates daily activities, even making note of their bathroom breaks, trips to the water cooler and time spent on the phones.

Etymology: Blend of 'snoop' (nosy person) and 'supervise' (be in charge)

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Whorology

Created by: Jamagra

Pronunciation: whore/ol'/uh/gee

Sentence: Daphne felt that Phillip, the new manager in the Department of Silly Clocks (afternoon watch), was a bit... alarming. She frequently heard him tocking to himself outside her office door. His imprecise movements infuriated her: only yesterday he had slopped quartz and quartz of water all over her timesheet and she'd had to redo it! Lately he'd taken to fobbing his unfinished work off on her just when things should have been winding down for the day. Quite often she had to wrist-le with the urge to clock Phillip upside the head. So far she'd proven resistant, but who knew how long that would last. Sometimes she fantasized about setting her hands around his windpipe... The man never seemed to notice all the nights she stayed back, but if she left work before 6pm, he would spring forward and reprimand her. She simply had to face facts: time had changed him from a horologist to a whorologist.

Etymology: whore + horology (the art or science of making timepieces or of measuring time)

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COMMENTS:

Face it, it's crystal clear that's my kind of story...Philip obviously has not had a good movement for some time, which is bound to wind him up and make him cuckoo! You'd be ticked, too. Oh well, even a broken clock is right twice a day...Cheers - Nosila, 2008-04-23: 01:28:00

dialightful! - galwaywegian, 2008-04-23: 06:10:00

Can the hands of a clock ever clap? great sentence - ticked all the boxes - Jabberwocky, 2008-04-23: 09:01:00

Don't forget the "Ho" in horology! Luv the sentence - OZZIEBOB, 2008-04-23: 17:54:00

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Taskmasterror

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /task-mas-TER-or/

Sentence: Ruth worked late four days out of the week, but she would sometimes have to leave early to pick up her daughter from daycare. On those days her boss, Mr. Petty, would make snide remarks if he saw her getting ready to leave, and she always had a feeling of taskmasterror that he was keeping track of every time she left work early and keeping it in her personnel file.

Etymology: Taskmaster - a person who supervises rigorously the work of others (from Middle English, taske "imposed work, tax" & Old English, magister "great") + Terror - intense, overpowering fear (from Latin, terrēre "to frighten")

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Gotchawatcher

Created by: TJayzz

Pronunciation: Got-char-wat-chur

Sentence: Bob knew that he wouldn't be able to leave work early, as the gotchawatcher had his eye on him.

Etymology: Got you + watcher = Gotchawatcher

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COMMENTS:

clever - Jabberwocky, 2008-04-23: 09:03:00

like it! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-04-23: 17:48:00

I used to work for that guy too. - Mustang, 2008-04-23: 21:56:00

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Clockblock

Created by: scissorlips

Pronunciation: klahk-blahk

Sentence: Emily was frequently at work well past closing time, finishing loose ends, making up time that was perhaps wasted by her co-workers. However, Fred, her boss, was always right there; a serious pain-in-the-butt that knew nothing of her week and clockblocked her just because she wanted to beat rush hour on Friday.

Etymology: Blocking progress based on a mutually visible clock.

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COMMENTS:

mad props - daniellegeorge, 2008-04-24: 13:18:00

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Stimie

karenanne

Created by: karenanne

Pronunciation: STY mee

Sentence: Early on in his new job, Ernest made the mistake of working late every day to catch up and to prove himself, thinking that would place him in the boss's good favor. Instead, it means that the boss, who himself doesn't usually hit the office until 10 am, has now forgotten Ernest's actual contract hours and assumes he will always be there until 7 pm. So now when Ernest decides to leave on time (5 pm) to actually spend time with his family, he is stimied at every turn by the boss's obvious disapproval. The boss likes to do such things as staring pointedly at his watch, sighing loudly and saying, "I guess I'll have to stay and finish things by myself tonight since there won't be anyone here to help," and making comments about how "people who are team players will the ones to keep their jobs when cuts are made." The funny thing is, Ernest has actually begun to feel guilty and acts apologetic as he is leaving (on time).

Etymology: time + stymie (to frustrate, hinder, or thwart)

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COMMENTS:

Truer words never spoken... - Nosila, 2010-06-29: 19:25:00

karenanne My first thought was "clocksucker" but then I figured I had already put in my share of vulgarity a couple of months ago with "dicktionary," "motherducker," and "bitchnessperson." - karenanne, 2010-06-29: 19:40:00

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