Verboticism: Demerritized

'When am I going to get a real holiday?'

DEFINITION: v., To run out of batteries during the holidays, especially on Christmas morning when all the kids and half the adults are screaming for their new toys. n., A battery or personal energy shortage created by over-consumption.

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Yuletired

Created by: rikboyee

Pronunciation: yool-tie-erd

Sentence: At the end of it all i was so yuletired i could hardly speak

Etymology: tired, yuletide

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Straindeer

Carla

Created by: Carla

Pronunciation: strayn-dear

Sentence: Thomas was fraught by the demands of cooking Christmas dinner for eight in a shoebox sized oven. He reached for another eggnog. In reply to his girlfriend's arched eyebrow, he angrily told her 'I'm feeling the straindeer, OK?!'

Etymology: strain + reindeer

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Holidie

Created by: KelleyToohey

Pronunciation: hŏl'ĭ-dī or "holly-die"

Sentence: "Halfway through Chanukah brunch with her in-laws, Midge began to holidie." "I feel holidead after wrapping presents all night."

Etymology: A blend between "holiday", a word meaning a day free from work or a holy day, and the verb "die", meaning to cease living.

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Shortrest

magillo

Created by: magillo

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Shortcelled

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: short - selled

Sentence: Connie felt really shortcelled on Christmas Day. She had stayed up half the night putting together toys, cooked a banquet for the next day, baked cookies, decorated and cleaned the house. To top it all off, she ran out of batteries for all of the toys and electonic gadgets she had bought and was too tired to go to the store.

Etymology: Short (less than, not having enough) + Cell (microprocessor architecture, In electronics, a battery is two or more electrochemical cells which store chemical energy and make it available as electrical energy)

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COMMENTS:

Your inventive pronunciation gives an an added commercial dimension. Shortcelled also conjured up visions of spent brain cells, too. Short and cell can have so many meanings and applications. Kudos for creating a word that can take on more than one meaning and have many dimensions, for that's not easy to do! - silveryaspen, 2008-12-24: 11:34:00

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Denergized

alanmilner

Created by: alanmilner

Pronunciation: as it reads

Sentence: I tried to demonstrate the new product, but all of my batteries had been denergized.

Etymology: denergized is a contraction of de-energized, and plays off the energizer battery campaign.

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Demerritized

Created by: Niktionary

Pronunciation: dee-mare-ih-tized

Sentence: When dad threw the tree out on the lawn, we knew he was clearly demerritized.

Etymology: demerrit+merry+desensitized

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Batolac

Slevara

Created by: Slevara

Pronunciation: bat-oh-lack

Sentence: Adj. Christmas was cancelled this year due to Santa's batolac attitude. N. Santa is such a batolac! I can't believe we had to cancel Christmas just because he fell asleep while basting the turkey. Adj. I think these batteries are batolac. We need to buy some more.

Etymology: "The batterers of lack" -Originally used to describe the men who carried battering rams when they ran out of energy before reaching their mark. Modern use has transferred use to mean batteries that have run out of energy or a person who has run out of energy before the event they were preparing for.

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Electonicrisis

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /ee-lek-tron'-i-kry-sis/

Sentence: With all of the battery-operated toys, gadgets and gizmos Adam had bought for the family this holiday, he had somehow forgotten to purchase batteries, and the ensuing electronicrisis forced him to go out looking for batteries in bulk, despite his hollythargic state.

Etymology: electronic (from Greek ēlektron "amber" & -ic "-like") + crisis (Greek, krísis "decision")

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COMMENTS:

*Science Content Warning* Apparently rubbing amber creates static electrical potential, which is perhaps why the Greeks associated amber with electricity, or at least the unexplained force that attracted feathers, hair and other small objects to the piece of amber. Hmm, I wonder what would happen if you rub amber on a cat... - Tigger, 2007-12-21: 02:46:00

Great week of wordmaking! - OZZIEBOB, 2007-12-21: 14:54:00

This is a great word, but its a noun. Make it a transitive verb and I'll vote for it. - KelleyToohey, 2007-12-23: 19:48:00

Check the 2nd part of the definition — it asks for a transitive verb -or- a noun. - Tigger, 2007-12-30: 23:33:00

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Celleighride

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: sell ay ryde

Sentence: It was time for the annual Christmas Celleighride. It became evident when the carol singing slightly changed. They subtlely sang Watt Child Is This?; I'll be ohm for Christmas;etc. Their batteries were losing power and only a celleighride to the local 7-11, the only shop open on this day, to get AA, AAA, C, D cell batteries would do. Poor Nick, he needed recharged himself, but to keep the peace, he'd make the trip and drag his exhausted self through the winter's exhaust. Their annual celebration always became a cellebration. Joule have a Blue Christmas without them!

Etymology: Cell (a device that delivers an electric current as the result of a chemical reaction) & Sleigh Ride (Popular Christmas Song and activity outdoors) Seligh also rhymes with slay (to kill something, like a battery)' Joule (a unit of electrical energy equal to the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second).

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