Verboticism: Amigonesia

'Who's the lucky lady?'

DEFINITION: v. To be unable to remember the name of a person you are speaking to, even though you've had a long-standing, and perhaps even an intimate relationship. n. An inability to remember a person's name.

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Amigonesia

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Tagsnag

Created by: kateinkorea

Pronunciation: tag snag

Sentence: I went to introduce my best friend to my mother and had a tagsnag. I just completely went blank.

Etymology: tag: used for name or identity snag: unforeseen problem or stumbling block

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COMMENTS:

metrohumanx Fresh aspect in TAGSNAG. I love it. Short and snappy, too. - metrohumanx, 2008-12-31: 01:12:00

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Amigonesia

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: am ego nees ya

Sentence: When what's-her-name...oh, yeah, Julia was kissing what's-his-name, oh yeah, Julio, his friend, what's-his-name, oh yeah, Raoul, ask who is the lucky lady? At first, what's his name, oh yeah, Julio was stumped, but he got over his amigonesia and realized that it was indeed, what's her name, oh yeah, Julia, his wife. The affects of too much sangria and tequila, old age and what's it called, oh yeah, amigonesia, had taken their toll on what's his name, oh yeah, Julio. It was another game of what's-it-called, oh yeah, Geriatric Jeopardy in full swing.

Etymology: Amigo (Spanish for friend) & Amnesia (partial or total loss of memory)

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Appellesia

Created by: gelsomina17

Pronunciation: apple-ee-sha

Sentence: Monica suffered an acute case of appellesia when she ran into her high school boyfriend at a party.

Etymology: appellation + amnesia

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COMMENTS:

Good one....very much like 'namenesia ' - Mustang, 2008-12-30: 00:29:00

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Whodonym

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /hoo-do-nim/

Sentence: Jason always called his fiancee by pet names, such as "Sweetheart" or "Honey," and although her name was actually 'Mary Louise' all her friends just called her "Lou". So when he introduced her to his cousin before the wedding, he got a case of 'brain lock' and all he could think of were whodonyms. Then, at the chapel, when the priest asked, "Do you take Mary Louise to be your lawfully wedded wife?" Jason's nervous first response was to ask, "Who?". It was beginning to look like the honeymoon wasn't going to be as pleasant and relaxing as he'd hoped.

Etymology: Who - what person? (from Old English, hwā "who") + pseudonym - a fictitious or pen name (from Greek, pseudonymos "having a false name")

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COMMENTS:

I'll be using "brain lock" ... great pairing! A Whodlum hopes everyone, especially the cops, have brain lock and whodonyms? Innovative! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 19:11:00

Very creative: a real word! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:01:00

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Dejawho

Created by: leegro

Pronunciation: /dey-zhah-hoo/

Sentence: As she walked down the aisle of the airplane, Sarah had a sinking feeling of dejawho. Hadn't she once drunkely groped the sweaty man in the aisle seat across from her?

Etymology: From "deja vu," which is French for "I'm not forgetful, I'm just self-absorbed," and "who," which should feel like a familiar word to most of you.

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COMMENTS:

What a twist ... a woman groping a man! But the twists in your etymology are even better! Insightfully Clever! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 17:14:00

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Amnamesia

Created by: zabxuq

Pronunciation: am-naim-shee-ah

Sentence: He distinctly remembered her smile but he couldn't respond to her greeting as he was dumbfounded by total amnamesia.

Etymology: name: identifying handle + amnesia: partial or complete loss of memory.

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Mnemnoops

Created by: Derrida

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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COMMENTS:

Nice start ... but where's the finish? You need to polish us off with the pronounciation, sentence and etymology ... and they each give you more points! Looking forward to reading more from you! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 17:31:00

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Lostnom

Created by: drewsky

Pronunciation:

Sentence:

Etymology:

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Whoblank

Created by: Biscotti

Pronunciation: hoo-blank

Sentence: He was suffering from whoblank when he called his fiance by the wrong name the other day...how embarassing!

Etymology: who + blank (draw a blank as to who it is)

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COMMENTS:

Perhaps Dr. Who or the Hoos put a forgetful spell on him! After his who blank he really needs some good-luck charm! Fantastic creation! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:28:00

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Disappellate

Created by: stache

Pronunciation: dis-āp'ə-lāt

Sentence: Julia had a strong urge to dismember Herman on the many occasions when he disappellated her in public.

Etymology: dis, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force, + appellation [Middle English appelacion, from Old French appelation, from Latin appellātiō], a name, title or designation.

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COMMENTS:

Great sentence! Dismember blew my mind ... nice double entendre! Well chosen etymology. Your word has an appealing international flair! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:07:00

I think William Tell's son felt the same way - Jabberwocky, 2008-03-04: 13:16:00

Dismember woulda shoulda coulda beena good one, too. - doseydotes, 2008-03-04: 17:17:00

Well defined! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:09:00

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