Verboticism: Youphenism

'What did you just call me?'

DEFINITION: v. To use alternative "code words" instead of proper cuss words, in an effort to satisfy people offended by such vulgarisms. n. A word used as a replacement for an obscene or profane expletive.

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Youphenism

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Frick

LittleMissSmile

Created by: LittleMissSmile

Pronunciation: Frick

Sentence: What the FRICK!?!

Etymology:

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Morfiting

Created by: WarriorCatGoddess

Pronunciation: More-fit-ing

Sentence: The boy was morfiting at his teacher for giving him an F on his quiz.

Etymology:

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Proxpletive

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: präksplitiv

Sentence: ”What the fudge is wrong with you? You’re a frickin rock star”, fumed Iggy’s manager. ”You’re supposed to be a hard-brass who curses like a sailor and the best we can get out of you is a proxpletive”.

Etymology: proxy (a person authorized to act on behalf of another) + expletive (an oath or swear word)

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Illewd

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: ill-LUDE

Sentence: Shane had a sick sense of humor and even in everyday conversation he'd take every opportunity to use substitute words to illewd to very trashy and disgusting language.

Etymology: blend of ill and lewd, play on the word 'allude'

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COMMENTS:

Shane was lewdicrous! - Nosila, 2009-06-22: 18:13:00

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Allewded

Created by: rombus

Pronunciation: al - lu - ded

Sentence: Olive often allewded to lewd and vulger words by subtituting them with wholesome sounding happy phrases.... It was extremely difficult to say with certainty what her real intentions were but she definitely got her point accross.

Etymology: alluded (made a disguised reference to), lewd

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COMMENTS:

Good one! - Mustang, 2009-06-23: 00:44:00

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Placeboath

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: (like 'placebo') /pluh-SEE-bohth/

Sentence: Sandra, a mother of three children and a former radio DJ, had trained herself never to swear, but she would often use placeboaths in place of profanity. So, when she yelled at Bobby, "Cheese and Crackers!! Get your gosh darn feet off the coffee table and stop acting like a fudging sugarhead!" nobody thought it was unusual. After all, Bobby really had been acting like a sugarhead.

Etymology: Placebo - a medication prescribed more for the mental relief of the patient than for its actual effect (Latin, placebo "I shall please") + Oath - any profane expression; curse; swearword (from Middle English, ooth "swear" [to a god or diety])

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COMMENTS:

an elegant creation, I must say - stache, 2008-05-08: 08:22:00

very nice - Jabberwocky, 2008-05-08: 14:21:00

Terrific! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-05-08: 19:37:00

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Poophemism

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: poooooo fem isum

Sentence: She let out a string of poophemisms that included a banker, a brickhead and several ducks

Etymology: euphemism, poo

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Fakeswear

Bookworm699

Created by: Bookworm699

Pronunciation:

Sentence: "Fat old beach," she fakeswore under her breath.

Etymology:

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Allewd

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: al-LUDE

Sentence: Carson has a quick and clever wit and a bit of a dirty mind and will often use 'substitute' words that are intended to allewd to something raunchy.

Etymology: Play on the words 'allude' and 'lewd'... to refer to something indirectly with couched obscenity

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Codeverse

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: code/vurs

Sentence: Around the office, us lackies have to codeverse so we don't offend the boss, or her prim and proper manager with our foul language. When angry at a co-worker, we often shout at them "Go f'coffee!", or "Eat hit, you bit head!", but so far our codeversations haven't raised the ire of the language police.

Etymology: code + converse (To engage in spoken exchange)

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