Verboticism: Namenesia

'Who's the lucky lady?'

DEFINITION: v. To be unable to remember the name of a person you are speaking to, even though you've had a long-standing, and perhaps even an intimate relationship. n. An inability to remember a person's name.

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Namenesia

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Palzheimers

Created by: OZZIEBOB

Pronunciation: palsz-HI-merz

Sentence: When Bob couldn't remember the names of his five former partners and his ten children, the judge wondered whether he was suffering from palzheimers, or that his namewashing was just a last-hitch attempt to avoid palimony.

Etymology: Blend of PAL: close friend, confidante etc & ALZHEIMERS: Used in the familiar and jocular sense for memory loss.

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COMMENTS:

Ach! You beat me to the Alzheimer's! (so to speak!)Well done, love your word. - Jamagra, 2008-03-04: 08:54:00

Good word. Kind of a sad idea, though. - ErWenn, 2008-03-04: 09:56:00

The opposite of palzheimers might be wisenheimers! Palzheimers might be a form of palsy of the brain! Your word is so evocative of so much! Stunningly great! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:20:00

a classic!! - galwaywegian, 2008-03-04: 12:11:00

excellent Ozzie - Jabberwocky, 2008-03-04: 13:03:00

Sweet! - purpleartichokes, 2008-03-04: 18:16:00

Unforgettable word, Bob! - Tigger, 2008-03-04: 18:34:00

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Babylabeler

picabomama

Created by: picabomama

Pronunciation: baby/label/er

Sentence: Aaron sounded fatherly and protective, but his wife knew that all the "honey", "sweetheart" & "baby" talk was really just a cover for his profound inability to remember a woman's name. He was a compulsive babylabeler.

Etymology: Baby- the most common name replacer + label

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COMMENTS:

I tried to come up with something along these lines, but buddyize, honeyify, and palform just don't roll off the tongue as well as babylabel. - ErWenn, 2008-03-04: 09:57:00

Wow! Sentence captures how annoying and offensive babylabelers are! Your word captures that feeling of being talked down to! Very apt creation! Simple but packs a wallop! Great create! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:15:00

Very true. Terms like mate, cobber, digger are often godsends for me! Unfortunately, Women's Lib has stamped out the use of luv, darl, etc. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 19:38:00

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Innomability

Created by: starwarsgeek8

Pronunciation: in-gnome-a-bill-it-ee

Sentence:

Etymology: Latin, 'nomen'=name, English 'ability'

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Whomnesia

Created by: diyan627

Pronunciation: Hoom-nee'-ja

Sentence: When trying to reassure his date, Thad blamed his inability to remember her name on whomnesia, and he left out the fact that he brought a different girl out the night before to meet his friends.

Etymology: who + amnesia

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COMMENTS:

Thad with whomnesia could suffer a rash of whoneedsya! Whooooomneeeeeeeeejaaaaaaaaaa just kind of sing-songs over the tongue ... so fun to sing it out! Very nice creation! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 16:53:00

Gezwhoomdeit!! Great verboticism - Mustang, 2008-03-04: 18:18:00

whoneedsya... hahaha! oh, that's brilliant! :D Thad is the 'victim' of whoneedsya, no doubt. - diyan627, 2008-03-07: 14:38:00

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Namenesia

Created by: 1101347158

Pronunciation: name

Sentence: I have namenesia at my cousin's party... It was kind of embarassing

Etymology: name + amnesia

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COMMENTS:

Schmidt's " A Medical Word Finder" gives 'Lethonomia' as inability to recognize names and ' Anomia' as loss of ability to recognize names; I like your word better. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 19:45:00

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Nomit

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: an/uh/nim

Sentence: On a regular basis, John nomits who he is with and just calls them 'Buddy' and 'Babe'.

Etymology: nom (name) + omit

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COMMENTS:

Uncomplicated but oh so powerful! Excellent creation! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 09:50:00

In the running for highest quality-to-length ratio for the whole site! - ErWenn, 2008-03-04: 09:59:00

I agree, Erwenn! Well put! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 19:01:00

Stevenson, every time I think of nomit, I think of gnome ... how in the world did you keep from making your sentence about gnomes? I've felt compelled all day to say your word (not sentence) has such a mythical and magical ambiance! So I finally said it! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 19:04:00

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Nomduhplume

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: nom/duh/ploom

Sentence: It is difficult enough to remember names of old friends but getting together with a writer's group became a nightmare trying to remember their nomduhplumes.

Etymology: nom de plume (pen name) + uh? + duh

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COMMENTS:

Delightful! - silveryaspen, 2008-12-29: 10:15:00

Eggzellunt!! Wish I'd thought of it! - Mustang, 2008-12-30: 00:28:00

Clever - OZZIEBOB, 2009-01-04: 16:13:00

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Memoromission

Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: mem - or - oh - miss - shun

Sentence: Plagued with a poor memory for names, Gilbert would often experience memoromission when encountering acquaintances.

Etymology: Mix of Memory and Omission

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COMMENTS:

Delightful mmmmmmm mmmmmm good alliteration! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:01:00

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Disappellate

Created by: stache

Pronunciation: dis-āp'ə-lāt

Sentence: Julia had a strong urge to dismember Herman on the many occasions when he disappellated her in public.

Etymology: dis, a Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “asunder,” “away,” or having a privative, negative, or reversing force, + appellation [Middle English appelacion, from Old French appelation, from Latin appellātiō], a name, title or designation.

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COMMENTS:

Great sentence! Dismember blew my mind ... nice double entendre! Well chosen etymology. Your word has an appealing international flair! - silveryaspen, 2008-03-04: 10:07:00

I think William Tell's son felt the same way - Jabberwocky, 2008-03-04: 13:16:00

Dismember woulda shoulda coulda beena good one, too. - doseydotes, 2008-03-04: 17:17:00

Well defined! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-03-04: 20:09:00

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Namenesia

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: nāmnēzhə

Sentence: Tom’s greatest fear before the class reunion was that he wouldn\'t be able to remember names of his former best friends. To avoid this he got out his yearbook and studied for weeks prior to the event. He was proud of himself, popping out names like he was still in school. Namenesia didn’t set in until he tried to introduce his wife.

Etymology: name (a word or set of words by which a person, animal, place, or thing is known, addressed, or referred to) + amnesia (a partial or total loss of memory)

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