Verboticism: Disbehave

'Honey, you just ran a red light!'

DEFINITION: v. To unintentionally encourage bad behavior by responding to it in a manner that incites even worse behavior. n. A response designed to stop bad behavior, which paradoxically produces more of it.

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Disbehave

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Negatentional

mrskellyscl

Created by: mrskellyscl

Pronunciation: neg-a-ten-shen-al

Sentence: As a teacher, Mary knew that negatentional responses were equal to posintentional ones to the kids who acted up to get her attention, although the results were disastrous for her classroom management. She soon realized that by nagging Kevin the same result would happen, Kevin would do the opposite of what she wanted to get a response from her. She decided to ignore the inappropriate behavior and reward him for proper behavior, just as she would her kindergarten children, in order for him to get posattention from her.

Etymology: negative: unfavorable or disconfirming + intentional: done deliberately + attention: notice or recognition. Teachers and trainers understand that to some children or animals negative attention is just as good as positive attention because it gives them the reward of recognition and response.

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COMMENTS:

Do I not lie it? Negatory! Good word. - Nosila, 2009-06-30: 17:31:00

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Habetual

Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: ha bet ual

Sentence: Joanie nagged at Chachi when he drove, which drove him insane. She failed to under stand that her habetual commentary on his poor driving habits made him a worse driver. It would have probably worked better if she had actually had a driving license of her own before passing such critiques on his driving skills...

Etymology: Habitual (commonly used or practiced; usual) & Abet (assist or encourage, usually in wrongdoing)

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Contradick

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: käntrədik

Sentence: Katy has just about had it with her boyfriend. He is such a contradick. Whenever she suggests a change to his behavior, he re-doubles his bad behavior to prove his independence.

Etymology: contradictory (mutually opposed or inconsistent) + dick (slang: jerk)

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Miscourage

Created by: jrogan

Pronunciation: mis-cur-rage

Sentence: Every time Sally miscouraged her boyfriend go slower, he went faster. It didn't matter whether they were on the highway, or in the bedroom.

Etymology: miss + courage as opposed to discourage

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Exacerbait

Created by: theCountess

Pronunciation: ex ass er bate

Sentence: Jill would constantly exacerbait Jack to complete exasperation; I think that's why he's now her ex.

Etymology: Exacerbate & Bait

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COMMENTS:

Good one - Nosila, 2010-07-21: 00:15:00

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Modifail

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: mod/i/fail

Sentence: As a teacher, I sometimes modifail when a student over reacts in a negative way to an attempted behaviour modifcation causing even further trouble in class.

Etymology: modify + fail

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Naggravate

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: /NAG-ruh-veyt/

Sentence: Matt was normally an aggressive driver — he practiced 'offensive driving' rather than 'defensive driving' — and when his passengers complained it would only naggravate the situation. Unfortunately, Matt's girlfriend, Mona, still hadn't learned this, and their roadtrips would turn into white-knuckled rollercoaster rides of reckless driving and near accidents, which only grew worse as Mona's screams intensified.

Etymology: Nag - to annoy by persistent faultfinding, complaints, or demands (from Old Norse, gnaga "to complain") + Aggravate - to make worse or more severe; intensify; irritate (from Latin, aggravāre "to burden")

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COMMENTS:

Good word!! - TJayzz, 2008-05-20: 11:28:00

good word. love Mona. - galwaywegian, 2008-05-20: 10:28:00

Was her name Mona Lott? Good Word - Nosila, 2008-05-20: 22:40:00

Yes, it was! Do you know her too? - Tigger, 2008-05-21: 00:30:00

Good word - OZZIEBOB, 2008-05-22: 01:20:00

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Pacifry

Created by: splendiction

Pronunciation: pass i FRY

Sentence: Blaze was having a small melt down when the ice cream truck sped by their home too quickly. His parents inadvertently pacifried him with the comment that ice cream from ice cream trucks, "is bad for you anyway." Blaze's melt down progressed into a full blown explosive fit of stamping, arm-flinging, and fiery-hot tearful cries: "BUD I WANNED NICE-CREAM!"

Etymology: A blend of PACIFY and FRY, overdo to the point of ruin.

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Wrecktify

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: rek tifff eye

Sentence: Herhigh pitched complaints only managed to wrectify the situation, as she put her foot on the imaginery brake.

Etymology: rectify wreck.

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COMMENTS:

wreckscellent word! - Nosila, 2008-05-20: 22:37:00

Nice word. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-05-22: 01:21:00

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Scaradigm

Created by: mweinmann

Pronunciation: skair - a - dime

Sentence: There was a scaradigm shift in Tony's behavior after Lisa tried to soothe him during the drive through the Catskills. The road was narrow and slippery and an antelope strolled out and started to play around in the headlights.

Etymology: scare (A general state of alarm), paradigm (A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality)

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