Verboticism: Overstalk

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Created by: apeavy




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Created by: Mustang

Pronunciation: FLOR-eh-side

Sentence: In a seemingly heartless attempt to commit floracide on an unwanted hideous tropical houseplant she had gotten as a gift, Gracie left it outdoors on the patio during the harshest part of the winter.

Etymology: 'Flora' (Plants considered as a group) with the suffix 'cide' (from Latin meaning “killer,” “act of killing,” used in the formation of compound words)

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Created by: Nosila

Pronunciation: leef owt syde

Sentence: Like clockwork, Flora's neighbours saw the same phenomena after each season...abandoned plants on her back porch. Poinsettia's after Christmas, Lillies after Easter, Mums after Thanksgiving, etc. Apparently ignorant on any kind of plant care knowledge,Flora would leafoutside any of these poor hothouse-raised, sensitive showy plants to fend for themselves. Inevitably, snow, frost, critters and lack of water sealed their fate. Those neighbours were very worried that one of these days, Flora might get pregnant and have a baby. If she ran true to form, they were afraid they might find the baby abandoned on the porch because he had outgrown the cute stage and was way too much work and bother. They speculated that if this was not the child's fate, he should be named "Leaf the Lucky"!

Etymology: Leaf (the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants) & Outside (Not inside, in the elements) & play on leave outside (abandon something to the Great Outdoors)

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Created by: LotusB

Pronunciation: Boat-an-ic-ice

Sentence: That ugly plant has got to go - botanicice that thing and let's be done with it!

Etymology: Botanic (plants) + Ice (slang; murder, also play on cold weather) = Botanicice

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Created by: rikboyee

Pronunciation: meen-thum

Sentence: it was clear that the sad little pot plant was making her kitchen gloomy and it was time for her to exercise her meanthumb

Etymology: mean, green thumb


It just works. - dubld, 2007-11-14: 09:06:00

pot plants usually have the opposite effect - why didn't she just smoke it? - Jabberwocky, 2007-11-14: 10:21:00

i'm gunja pretend you didn't say that - rikboyee, 2007-11-14: 15:31:00

doobie doobie do - where's purple when you want to sing - you know youjuana - Jabberwocky, 2007-11-14: 16:25:00

Seems to mean it's all about meangreen! Nice word! - OZZIEBOB, 2007-11-14: 17:16:00

Purple's been swamped at work, with no signs of letting up until after Jan 15. Poor Purple. Love your word Rik. - purpleartichokes, 2007-11-14: 18:25:00


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Created by: MithrilShadow

Pronunciation: ˈshrəb-ə-ˌsīd

Sentence: In the winter of 2006, millions of Americans abandoned their poor Poinsettias on their door step with out adequate food or shelter in hopes to kill them in mass numbers. It was the worst case of Shrubicide ever recorded.

Etymology: Shrub: a low usually several-stemmed woody plant. -cide: killer

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Created by: mplsbohemian

Pronunciation: in-PLAN-tih-syed

Sentence: The the rare variety of African violet that Alex had given his girlfriend was the victim of ruthless inplanticide.

Etymology: indoor + plant + infanticide (indicates helplessness)

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Created by: emilylind

Pronunciation: Say never then in after door and finally a .

Sentence: This plant is a Nevraindoora .


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Created by: amcfarlane


Sentence: Jack decided to exfloriate the grim-looking rubber plant his great aunt had purchased him for a house-warming present.


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Created by: SpaceCadet

Pronunciation: fye'-toe-sighed

Sentence: "I can't believe you're up to your second phytocide in one year!" said Johnny to his wife as she placed the Poinsettia out on the glacial porch. "Well it's not my fault if they keep showing up unwanted," she replied non-chalantly, some would say psycho-phytopathically.

Etymology: 1. phyto-: relating to plants, from the Greek "phuton" (a plant) from "phuein" (come into being) 2. -cide: denoting an act of killing, from the Latin "-cida" from "caedere" (to kill)


Honestly, I can't believe this isn't in the dictionary already... - SpaceCadet, 2007-11-14: 12:08:00


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